6-K

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549


FORM 6-K

Report of Foreign Private Issuer
Pursuant to Rule 13a-16 or 15d-16
of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the Month of March 2009


HADERA PAPER LTD.
(Translation of Registrant’s Name into English)

P.O. Box 142, Hadera, Israel
(Address of Principal Corporate Offices)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant files or will file annual reports under cover of Form 20-F or Form 40-F:

x Form 20-F     o Form 40-F

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is submitting the Form 6-K in paper as permitted by Regulation S-T Rule 101(b)(1): o

Note: Regulation S-T Rule 101(b)(1) only permits the submission in paper of a Form 6-K if submitted solely to provide an attached annual report to security holders.

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is submitting the Form 6-K in paper as permitted by Regulation S-T Rule 101(b)(7): o

Note: Regulation S-T Rule 101(b)(7) only permits the submission in paper of a Form 6-K submitted to furnish a report or other document that the registrant foreign private issuer must furnish and make public under the laws of the jurisdiction in which the registrant is incorporated, domiciled or legally organized (the registrant’s “home country”), or under the rules of the home country exchange on which the registrant’s securities are traded, as long as the report or other document is not a press release, is not required to be and has not been distributed to the registrant’s security holders, and, if discussing a material event, has already been the subject of a Form 6-K submission or other Commission filing on EDGAR.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant by furnishing the information contained in this form is also thereby furnishing the information to the Commission pursuant to Rule 12g3-2(b) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934:

o Yes     x No

If “Yes” is marked, indicate below the file number assigned to the registrant in connection with Rule 12g3-2(b): 82-______________



        Attached hereto as Exhibit 1 and incorporated herein by reference is the Registrant’s press release dated March 11, 2009 with respect to the Registrant’s results of operations for the year ended December 31, 2008.

        Attached hereto as Exhibit 2 and incorporated herein by reference is the Registrant’s Management Discussion with respect to the Registrant’s results of operations for the year ended December 31, 2008.

        Attached hereto as Exhibit 3 and incorporated herein by reference are the Registrant’s unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2008.

        Attached hereto as Exhibit 4 and incorporated herein by reference is the Registrant’s periodical report for the year ended December 31, 2008.

        Attached hereto as Exhibit 5 and incorporated herein by reference are the unaudited condensed interim consolidated financial statements of Mondi Paper Hadera Ltd. and subsidiaries with respect to the year ended December 31, 2008.

        Attached hereto as Exhibit 6 and incorporated herein by reference are the unaudited condensed interim consolidated financial statements of Hogla-Kimberly Ltd. and subsidiaries with respect to the year ended December 31, 2008.

SIGNATURE

        Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

HADERA PAPER LTD.
(Registrant)

By: /s/ Lea Katz
——————————————
Lea Katz
Corporate Secretary

Dated: March 11, 2009.



EXHIBIT INDEX

Exhibit No. Description

1. Press release dated March 11, 2009.

2. Registrant's management discussion.

3. Registrant's unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

4. Registrant's periodical report.

5. Unaudited condensed interim consolidated financial statements of Mondi Business Paper Hadera Ltd. and subsidiaries.

6. Unaudited condensed interim consolidated financial statements of Hogla-Kimberly Ltd. and subsidiaries.



Exhibit 1

  NEWS
 
  For Release:   IMMEDIATE

Hadera Paper Ltd.
Reports Financial Results for Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2008

Hadera, Israel, March 11, 2009 – Hadera Paper Ltd. (AMEX:AIP) (the “Company” or “Hadera Paper”) today reported financial results for the year ended December 31, 2008. The Company, its subsidiaries and associated companies are referred to hereinafter as the “Group”.

As a result of the transition to reporting according to IFRS, the Company presented its financial statements for 2008, as well as the comparison figures for the year ended December 31, 2007, according to IFRS.

Since the Company’s share in the earnings of associated companies constitutes a material component in the company’s statement of income (primarily on account of its share in the earnings of Mondi Hadera Paper Ltd. (“Mondi Hadera”) and Hogla-Kimberly Ltd. (“H-K”)), before the presentation of the consolidated data below, the aggregate data which include the results of all the companies in the Hadera Paper Group (including the associated companies whose results appear in the financial statements under “earnings from associated companies”) is being presented, without considering the rate of holding therein and net of mutual sales.

Aggregate sales amounted to NIS 3,229.1 million in 2008, as compared with NIS 3,124.3 million in the corresponding period last year.

Aggregate operating profit in 2008 amounted to NIS 203.0 million, as compared with NIS 183.8 million in 2007. The significant improvement in the aggregate operating profit is attributed to the performance improvement at some of the Israeli companies on the one hand, coupled with the continuing trend of a lower operating loss in Turkey on the other hand.

The Consolidated Data set forth below excluding the results of operation of the associated companies: Mondi Hadera, H-K. Consolidated Data include the sales turnover of Carmel Containers Systems Ltd. (“Carmel”) and Frenkel- C.D. Ltd. (“Frenkel- C.D.”) that were consolidated as of September 2008 due to the completion of transaction for the acquisition of Carmel shares.

Consolidated sales during 2008 amounted to NIS 673.5 million, as compared with NIS 583.6 million in 2007.

Operating profit amounted to NIS 35.4 million in 2008, as compared with NIS 71.1 million in 2007. Most of the erosion in the profit was due to changes in the dollar exchange rate, which negatively impacted the selling prices, to dumping prices of competing imports and to the apparent slowdown in the operations during the final quarter of 2008, as a result of the financial crisis.



The net profit attributed to the Company’s shareholders in 2008 amounted to NIS 69.7 million, as compared with net profit of NIS 31.5 million in 2007, and was affected by the improvement in the profitability of some of the Group’s companies in Israel, from recording profit from the allocation of excess negative cost as a result of the acquisition of Carmel and Frenkel CD – whose net impact on the net profit attributed to the Company’s shareholders amounted to NIS 10.6 million and from the significant reduction of the Company’s share in the losses of the operations in Turkey (KCTR). On the other hand, the net profit decreased as a result of recording an expenditure of NIS 10.0 million from the valuation of a PUT option at Mondi.

The net profit attributed to the shareholders of the company in the fourth quarter this year amounted to NIS 10.2 million, as compared with net profit attributed to the company’s shareholders of NIS 17.5 million in the corresponding quarter last year.

Basic earnings per share amounted to NIS 13.77 per share ($3.62 per share) in 2008, as compared with basic earnings per share of NIS 7.63 per share ($1.98 per share) in 2007.

The inflation rate in 2008 amounted to 3.8%, as compared with an inflation rate of 3.4% in 2007.

Mr. Avi Brener, Chief Executive Officer of the Company said that “In view of the global recession, the Company formulated in recent months an action plan which includes aggressive measures to improve efficiency, cut current investments, cut general expenses. True to this date, there is no material impact as a result of the escalation of the global financial crisis, on the Company’s business results, its financial robustness or the value of its assets. In the first half of 2008, input prices rose for energy, fibers, chemicals and commodities, a trend that was reversed in the second half of the year due to the global crisis. The Company’s transition, at the end of 2007, to using natural gas, has led to NIS 46 million in Group-wide (including associated companies) energy-cost savings in 2008. These savings were partially offset as a result of the increase in electricity prices in 2008. In the second half of 2008, the global paper market, particularly Europe, saw the start of a trend of slowing demand that led to surplus production in the market, which increased the importing of fine paper and packaging paper from Europe at dumping prices. In order to avoid erosion of its gross margin, the Group filed two complaints, with the Supervisor of Anti-Dumping Charges at the Israeli Ministry of Industry, Trade and Employment, regarding dumping imports of packaging paper and fine paper from several European nations to Israel. In both cases, the Supervisor decided to launch an investigation. There is no certainty that the above complaints would be accepted, and the Company is currently unable to estimate the impact of such acceptance on its business results. The average revaluation of the NIS against the US$ coupled with the revaluation of the NIS against the euro had a positive impact on the Company with regard to imported inputs while, on the other hand, serving to erode the selling prices in the main operating segments of the Company whose prices are denominated in US$. In the fourth quarter, the trend in input prices was reversed and prices started to decline due to the aforementioned crisis – which served to somewhat offset the looming slowdown in operations in both local and export markets. The overall business range and currency operations of the Hadera Paper Group, including its associated companies, is relatively balanced and the Company’s exposure to sharp fluctuations in exchange rates is therefore low.”

In the reported period, KCTR continued to implement its strategic plan formulated by the Company together with the international partner, Kimberly Clark.

Financial expenses in 2008 amounted to NIS 15.0 million, as compared with NIS 22.2 million in the corresponding period last year.

2



The company’s share in the earnings of associated companies totaled NIS 51.3 million in 2008, as compared with NIS 0.9 million in 2007. The Company’s share in the earnings of associated companies amounted to NIS 14.7 million in the fourth quarter of the year, as compared with NIS 7.9 million in the corresponding quarter last year.

The following principal changes were recorded in the Company’s share in the earnings of associated companies, in relation to 2007:

  The Company’s share in the net profit of Mondi Hadera (49.9%) rose by NIS 0.6 million. The increased income was primarily attributed to the improvement in Mondi’s operating profit, which grew from NIS 33.6 million last year to NIS 34.1 million this year – primarily due to a quantitative increase in sales, operating efficiency and lower energy costs due to the transition to using natural gas at the Hadera site. The net profit also increased as a result of the decrease in financial expenses this year in relation to last year, primarily on account of the impact of the revaluation of the NIS against the dollar.

  The company’s share in the net earnings of H-K Israel (49.9%) increased by approximately NIS 12.3 million. The improved operating profit originated from a quantitative increase in sales, improved selling prices net of the impact of higher raw material prices, the continuing implementation of efficiency measures and the continuing trend of raising the proportion of some of the premium products out of the products basket, while innovating products and empowering the Company’s brands.

  The Company’s share in the losses of KCTR Turkey (49.9%) decreased by NIS 48.0 million. The significant decrease in the loss is attributed to the growth in the volumes of operation that led to a significant reduction in the operating loss, from NIS 73.7 million last year to approximately NIS 33.4 million this year. In 2007, the Company recorded a non-recurring loss in respect of termination of trade agreements with distributors following the transition to distribution by Unilever, amounting to approximately NIS 6 million, of which the Company’s share amounts to approximately NIS 3 million. Moreover, the tax asset that was recorded in previous years in Turkey, in the sum of approximately NIS 26.8 million was reduced, of which our share is NIS 13.4 million. Moreover, due to the increase in the shareholders’ equity of KCTR through a financial influx from Hogla, the bank loans were repaid, while significantly reducing the financial expenses, thereby leading to an additional reduction in the net loss.

  The Company’s share in the loss of Carmel (36.21% before August 31, 2008 – the date of consolidation), increased by NIS 6.4 million. This increase is attributed to the sharp erosion in the operating margin as a result of lower demand for packaging due to the slowdown in industrial exports on account of the erosion of currency exchange rates vis-à-vis the NIS, coupled with the damages of the cold spell in the agricultural sector. On the other hand, the prices of imported raw materials did not decrease in NIS terms, due to hedging transactions on exchange rates.

3



This report contains various forward-looking statements based upon the Board of Directors’ present expectations and estimates regarding the operations and plans of the Group and its business environment. The Company does not guarantee that the future results of operations will coincide with the forward-looking statements and these may in fact differ considerably from the present forecasts as a result of factors that may change in the future, such as changes in costs and market conditions, failure to achieve projected goals, failure to achieve anticipated efficiencies and other factors which lie outside the control of the Company as well as certain other risks detailed from time to time in the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The Company undertakes no obligation for publicly updating the said forward-looking statements, regardless of whether these updates originate from new information, future events or any other reason.

Hadera PAPER LTD.
SUMMARY OF RESULTS
(AUDITED)
except per share amounts
NIS IN THOUSANDS (1)
2008
2007
 
Net sales      673,484    583,650  
   
Net earnings attributed to the Company's  
shareholders    69,710    31,535  
   
Basic net earnings per share attributed to  
the Company's shareholders    13.77    7.63  
   
Fully diluted earnings per share attributed  
to the Company's shareholders    13.77    7.62  

(1) The representative exchange rate at December 31, 2008 was NIS 3.802=$1.00.

(2) The net profit attributed to the Company’s shareholders in 2008 was affected by the improvement in the profitability of some of the Group’s companies in Israel, from recording profit from the allocation of excess negative cost as a result of the acquisition of Carmel and Frenkel CD – whose net impact on the net profit attributed to the Company’s shareholders amounted to NIS 10.6 million and the significant reduction of the Company’s share in the losses of the operations in Turkey (KCTR), as compared with 2007. On the other hand, the net profit decreased as a result of recording an expenditure of NIS 10.0 million from the valuation of a PUT option at Mondi

(3) The net profit in 2007 was affected by the growth in the Company’s share in the losses of the operations in Turkey (KCTR), amounting to approximately NIS 11.8 million (from NIS 52.0 million last year to NIS 63.8 million this year), as compared with the preceding year. In 2007, the net profit included earnings from the realization of surplus cost at an associated company in the amount of NIS 2.5 million, a loss from the amortization of a tax asset at an associated company in the sum of NIS 13.4 million and a capital loss from the sale of cardboard machines (machine 6) and hub machines in the sum of NIS 2.4 million.

Contact:
Lea Katz, Adv.
Corporate Secretary and Chief of Legal Department
Hadera Paper Ltd. Group
Tel:+972-4-6349408
Leak@aipm.co.il

4



Exhibit 2

Translation from Hebrew

March 11, 2009

MANAGEMENT DISCUSSION

We are honored to present the consolidated financial statements of the Hadera Paper Group Ltd. (“Hadera Paper” or “The Company”) (formerly – American Israeli Paper Mills – “AIPM”) for the year 2008. The Company, its consolidated subsidiaries and its associated companies – hereinafter: “The Group”.

A. Description of the Corporation’s Business

  1. Company Description

  Hadera Paper deals in the manufacture and sale of packaging paper, corrugated board packaging, consumer goods packaging and unique packaging for industry, recycling of paper and plastic waste and in the marketing of office supplies – through subsidiaries. The Company also holds associated companies that deal in the manufacture and marketing of fine paper, in the manufacture and marketing of household paper products, hygiene products, disposable diapers and complementary kitchen products.

  The company’s securities are traded on the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange and on the American Stock Exchange, AMEX.

  2. General

  a. Updating of data to comply with IFRS

  As a result of the transition to reporting according to IFRS, the Company presented its financial statements for 2008, as well as the comparison figures for the year ended December 31, 2007, according to IFRS. Accordingly, the data appearing in the Management Discussion and the comparison figures are presented according to IFRS.

  b. Principal Current Operations

  1. Business Environment

  Global financial markets suffered a considerable upheaval in 2008, an upheaval that reached new highs during the period between September and October 2008, with the collapse of several large financial entities in the United States and elsewhere around the world, along with global stock markets. This economic and financial crisis came in the wake of the subprime mortgage crisis, that began in the second half of 2007 and affected additional financial sectors. The global economic and financial crisis resulted inter alia in severe damage to global capital markets, downturns and fierce fluctuations in stock exchanges both in Israel and worldwide and in the worsening of the credit crunch that started in the wake of the subprime mortgage crisis. Following the said events, several nations initiated various measures in order to stabilize and prevent an additional deterioration of financial markets, by way of injecting funds into financial institutions while also lowering interest rates. However, there is still no certainty that these measures have indeed tamed the crisis or prevented its deterioration and there is no certainty that they will in fact do so.

1



  Over the last several months, the said financial crisis began to materialize in the form of a real economic crisis, as various economies around the world, including the United States, central economies in Europe and the Israeli market as well, entered into a recession, accompanied by the discontinuation of numerous operations and mass employee layoffs in various market sectors, including industry, services and high-tech.

  As of the report date, it would seem that the direct economic repercussions of the aforementioned crisis have yet to run their course, and a concern exists that Israel’s economy may slide into recession, similar to other economies around the world.

  In view of the global recession, the Company formulated in recent months an action plan which includes aggressive measures to improve efficiency, cut current investments, cut general expenses (regarding the waiver of senior executive wages – see Section K, below), continued measures for improved efficiency across the group, focus on purchasing operations in order to reduce expenses related to the purchase of raw materials, services and products as well as focused management of operational working capital and control of customer credit exposure. Along with these actions, the Company continues to identify business opportunities to enable accelerated growth and improved margins in its various sectors of operation in Israel and overseas.

  Alongside the said global financial crisis, several events occurred in the Israeli economy in the second half of 2008, including significant fluctuations in the exchange rates of principal currencies vis-à-vis the NIS.

  These market developments and fluctuations may potentially have adverse effects on the business results of the Company and its investee companies, including an effect on their liquidity, the value of their assets, the ability to divest assets, the state of their business, their financial indicators and standards, their credit rating, ability to distribute dividends, ability to raise financing for their current operations and long-term plans, as well as on their financing terms.

  True to the date of publication of the financial statements, there is no material impact as a result of the escalation of the crisis, on the Company’s business results, its financial robustness or the value of its assets.

2



  In the course of the third quarter, the Company conducted two offerings in the total sum of NIS 426 million, by way of issuing to the public series of debentures that render it possible for the company to promote the long-term strategic projects on which it is focusing. The Company does not currently anticipate difficulties in raising additional financing in case of need.

  The above information constitutes forward-looking information as defined in the Securities Law, based on the company’s estimates at the date of this report. These estimates may not materialize – in whole or in part – or may materialize in a different manner, inter alia on account of factors that lie outside the control of the company, such as the global crisis in credit and banking markets.

As at the date of publication of these financial statements, no material changes have occurred to the Company’s risk management policy.

  In the first half of 2008, input prices rose for energy, fibers, chemicals and commodities – a trend that was reversed in the second half of the year due to the global crisis. The Company’s transition, in the fourth quarter of 2007, to using natural gas, has led to NIS 46 million in Group-wide energy-cost savings in 2008, as compared with last year – primarily due to the transition to steam production using natural gas and to self-generation of electricity based on gas rather than on fuel oil. These savings were partially offset as a result of the increase in electricity prices in 2008, by an average rate of 17% in relation to 2007, as mentioned above.

  In the second half of 2008, the global paper market – and particularly in Europe –saw the start of a trend of slowing demand, that led to surplus production in the market. Due to the said surplus production, the importing of fine paper and packaging paper from Europe at dumping prices rose in the second half of 2008. In order to avoid erosion of its gross margin, the Company announced on January 15, 2009, that it had filed a complaint, as a manufacturer of packaging paper, with the Supervisor of Anti-Dumping Charges and Homogenization Charges at the Ministry of Industry, Trade and Employment (hereinafter: “The Supervisor”), regarding dumping imports of packaging paper from several European nations to Israel. Upon review of the complaint, the Supervisor decided to launch an investigation of this issue. On February 26, 2009, the company announced that the associated company Mondi Hadera Paper had filed a complaint to the supervisor, regarding the dumping imports of fine paper from several European nations to Israel. Upon review of the complaint, the Supervisor decided to launch an investigation of this issue. According to the Company announcement, there is no certainty that the above complaints would be accepted, and the Company is currently unable to estimate the impact of such acceptance on its business results.

  The average revaluation of the NIS against the US$ – amounting to approximately 13% in 2008 as compared with 2007 – coupled with the revaluation of the NIS against the euro had a positive impact on the Company with regard to imported inputs while, on the other hand, serving to erode the selling prices in the main operating segments of the Company whose prices are denominated in US$. In the most recent quarter, the trend in input prices was reversed and prices started to decline due to the aforementioned crisis – which served to somewhat offset the looming slowdown in operations in both local and export markets.

3



  The overall business range and currency operations of the Hadera Paper Group, including its associated companies, is relatively balanced and the Company’s exposure to sharp fluctuations in exchange rates is therefore low.

  The above information pertaining to trends in the paper market constitutes forward-looking information as defined in the securities law, based on the company’s estimates at the date of this report. These estimates may not materialize – in whole or in part –or may materialize in a different manner, inter alia on account of factors that lie outside the control of the company, such as changes in global raw material prices and changes in the supply and demand of global paper products.

  The sharp fluctuations in global fuel prices in 2008 had no material impact on the Company, due to the transition to the use of natural gas instead of fuel oil in its production processes, which began in the fourth quarter of 2007. This fact served to improve the Group’s competitive capability vis-à-vis its European competitors and partially offset the aforementioned impact of the price erosion.

  The inflation rate in 2008 amounted to 3.8%, as compared with an inflation rate of 3.4% in 2007.

  Considerable volatility was recorded in 2008 in the exchange rate of the US dollar in relation to the NIS, throughout the year. The US dollar exchange rate fell by 1.1% in 2008, in addition to a 9% decrease in 2007.

  2. Principal Current Operations

  In the course of the reported period and despite the sharp change in the business environment, the aggregate sales turnover continued to grow, as illustrated by a 3.3% increase in relation to the aggregate sales turnover in the corresponding period last year.

  Implementation and Assimilation of Organization-Wide Processes

  In the course of the reported period, the Group companies continued to implement and assimilate organization-wide processes that are intended to empower Group-company operations and support continued growth and increased profitability in organizational development, Group purchasing, B2B marketing, development and innovation. The gradual and successful implementation of these brands will enable the company to better deal with the challenging business environment, while improving profitability.

  3. The Strategic Plans

  In parallel to the ongoing operations, the Company is working to successfully implement the strategic plans that are intended to lead to continued growth in operations and improved profitability over the coming years:

4



  a. Expanding the recycled packaging paper manufacturing network

  The investment in the project for the construction of the new manufacturing network, totaling NIS 690 million was approved on October 15, 2007 by the Company’s Board of Directors. The Company has selected the most highly advanced technologies in this area, from the leading suppliers in the sector, in order to amplify its competitive advantage and potential for profitability in the long term.

  The implementation of the project is advancing as planned and the Company has completed the signing of central agreements for the purchasing of the main manufacturing equipment. The construction of the structure for the machine is advancing at the site, in preparation for receiving the equipment whose arrival will begin towards the end of the year.

  In parallel, the Amnir Recycling Industries Ltd. (“Amnir”), a Company’s subsidiary, is continuing preparations for the expansion of the collection of cardboard and newspaper waste and is continuing to accumulate inventories toward the planned operation of the new machine toward the end of 2009.

  As part of this project, the company is investing in the reorganization of the principal site in Hadera, including an expansion of the energy system and the adaptation of the traffic routes and upgrading of environmental systems, as required.

  As part of the preparations for financing the project, additional capital of approximately NIS 211 million was raised in November 2007, by way of a private placement of shares to the controlling shareholders and to institutional investors. In the course of July 2008, the Company raised a net sum of approximately NIS 306 million, after deducting the offering expenses. In August 2008, the Company raised approximately NIS 120 million, after deducting offering expenses, by way of issuing debentures to institutional investors and to the public. The capital that was raised is intended to serve for covering the payments to the suppliers of equipment for Machine 8 and constitutes most of the sum necessary for financing this project. In addition to the above measures, the Company is continuing to explore additional ways to complete the remaining necessary project financing.

  b. Innovative development of high-quality recycled paper

  Over the past year, the packaging paper and recycling division launched the rapid development of paper types based on 100% recycled fibers, whose superior quality would allow them to replace pulp-based packaging paper in the corrugated board industry in Israel and overseas.

The technological and operational development process is currently in advanced stages and is meant to increase the volume of the potential market for packaging paper for the local corrugated board industry, from 170,000 tons per annum at the present time, to approximately 250,000 tons per annum in the coming years.

  The development of new paper types is based on the characterization of fibers, developing and implementing new chemical additives and using these advanced manufacturing technologies, both in the existing production lines and in the new production line, to render it possible to gradually launch new products, as early as in 2009 and throughout 2010.

5



  According to the plan, the cost of the new paper types will be competitive as compared with the cost of pulp-based paper and will allow for a gradual improvement in the profitability of the sector. According to laboratory tests, the indications from the development process in the production lines and initial markets tests, it appears that the probability for success in this area is relatively high.

  The above information pertaining to the innovative developments in the paper market constitutes forward-looking information as defined in the Securities Law, based on the company’s estimates at the date of this report. These estimates may not materialize – in whole or in part – or may materialize in a different manner, inter alia on account of factors that lie outside the control of the company.

  c. New Power Plant

  The new power plant project, intended to supply steam and electricity to the production system in Hadera and to sell surplus electricity to Israel Electric Company (IEC) and/or to private consumers, is on hold, awaiting the business stabilization of potential gas sources in order to conclude the contract to acquire the required gas at a price range that would allow the Company to be competitive with expected IEC rates. The Company is working to extend the existing production license, for the purpose of building a 230 MW power station, to be constructed on an 80,000 m(2) plot of land that was acquired for this purpose, in immediate proximity to the Company’s site in Hadera.

  Discovery of additional natural gas deposits at Tamar-1 and progress made by the Egyptian gas franchisee (EMG) improve the likelihood of renewed negotiations to kick off the project.

  The above information pertaining to trends in the energy sector, based on natural gas, constitutes forward-looking information as defined in the Securities Law, based on the company’s estimates at the date of this report. These estimates may not materialize – in whole or in part – or may materialize in a different manner, inter alia on account of factors that lie outside the control of the company, such as the size of the actual gas reservoir, as well as changes in gas prices worldwide.

  d. The Strategic Investment in Turkey

  In 2008, Kimberly Clark Turkey, KCTR, a wholly-owned Hogla Kimberly subsidiary (49.9% of which is held by the company) – continued to implement its strategic plan GBP –(Global Business Plan) that was formulated together with the international partner, Kimberly Clark. The plan is intended to introduce Kimberly Clark’s global brands to Turkey, on the basis of local manufacturing. If fully implemented, KCTR will grow to become a company with annual sales in the area of $300 million, by 2015.

6



  The sales turnover of KCTR amounted to approximately $115.0 million in 2008, as compared with $63.3 million in 2007, representing an increase of 81.7%.

  In the course of 2008, the company continued to empower its brands and especially the Huggies® and Kotex® brands, was realizing constant growth in both market share and rising awareness toward the company’s products. In parallel, the volume of exports to Kimberly-Clark in various other countries in Europe and Africa also increased.

  The company’s continuing marketing and advertising operations are being felt in the gradual strengthening of the brands, as expressed by consumer studies that are being conducted regularly, alongside consistent growth in sales, while curtailing the operating loss and a considerable reduction in the Company’s net loss.

  As part of the strategic plan, the Company intends to continue its marketing and sales promotion efforts, while launching new products that will support the establishment of the brands and the creation of customer loyalty.

  Moreover, In the course of 2008, the Company continued to promote the collaboration with Unilever and expanded the number of points of sale in the Turkish market that sell KCTR brands.

  The continuing high level of competition in the markets where the company is working to penetrate and empower its brands calls for regular and significant investments in advertising and sales promotion.

  All of the expenses detailed above associated with the penetration of products, advertising, expansion of the distribution network and more – are regularly recorded as an expenditure in the KCTR statements of income. KCTR recorded an operating loss of approximately NIS 33.4 million (approximately $9.3 million) in 2008, as compared with NIS 74 million (approximately $17.9 million) in 2007.

  The implementation of the strategic business plan, while strengthening the brands and recording a gradual growth in the Unilever distribution and sales platforms, in combination with increased exports and continuing cost reductions at the diaper plant – are rendering it possible to maintain the trend of improving gross margins –as mentioned above – in 2008 as well.

  The above information pertaining to the KCTR business plans and their implementation constitutes forward-looking information as defined in the securities law, based on the company’s estimates at the date of this report. These estimates may not materialize – in whole or in part – or may materialize in a different manner, inter alia on account of factors that lie outside the control of the company, such as market conditions, legislation and various costs.

7



B. Analysis of the Company’s Financial Situation

  Starting September 1, 2008, the financial statements of Carmel Container Systems Ltd. (“Carmel”) and Frenkel- CD Ltd. (“Frenkel- C.D.”) (an associated company of Carmel’s and of the Company), are being consolidated within the company’s financial statements, as a result of the fact that the holding rate in Carmel has increased from 36.2% to 89.3%, and at Frenkel CD, indirectly, from 37.93% to 52.72% (for details see Note 15 to the financial statements). The analysis of the financial statements, as described below, is affected by this consolidation.

  The cash and cash equivalents item decreased from NIS 167.7 million as of December 31, 2007 to NIS 13.1 million as of December 31, 2008. The difference, together with additional amounts that resulted from the private placement carried out last year and from the issuance of several series of debentures in the third quarter of the year, was deposited in euro-linked deposits in the amount of NIS 125.7 million and in NIS deposits in the amount of 123.9 million, which have been designated for the payment of amounts pertaining to the construction of the facility for the manufacturing of packaging paper, and are presented under “designated cash”.

  The balance of trade receivables in respect of packaging paper, recycling and cardboard, increased from NIS 138.3 million as of December 31, 2007 to NIS 273.8 million as of December 31, 2008. This increase is primarily attributed to the consolidation of the trade receivables of Carmel and Frenkel CD in the amount of NIS 186.1 million, net of the effect of the reduction in prices in NIS terms following the devaluation of the dollar exchange rate, net of trade receivable balances at Carmel, that were cancelled as a result of the consolidation of the financial statements. Accounts receivable for the office supplies marketing activity rose from NIS 40.3 million as at December 31, 2007 to NIS 45.1 million, as at December 31, 2008, as a result of growth in the volume of operations.

  Accounts receivable in the packaging paper, recycling and cardboard activity increased from NIS 91.3 million as of December 31, 2007 to NIS 95.1 million as of December 31, 2008. This increase is primarily attributed to the consolidation of the accounts receivable of Carmel and Frenkel CD in the amount of NIS 5.8 million. In the office supplies marketing activity, the Other Accounts Receivable item increased from NIS 3.1 million on December 31, 2007, to NIS 5.8 million on December 31, 2008.

  Inventories in the packaging paper and recycling activity increased from NIS 51.2 million as of December 31, 2007, to NIS 146.3 million as of December 31, 2008. This increase is primarily due to the consolidation of Carmel and Frenkel CD inventories, amounting to NIS 87.2 million. Inventories in the office supplies marketing activity grew from NIS 18.4 million on December 31, 2007, to NIS 22.5 million on December 31, 2008, primarily due to the increased share of products imported from Eastern Asia for the purpose of improving profitability, as well as due to acquired inventories in conjunction with the acquisition of the business operations of Yavne Pitango Ltd. in Northern Israel in early August, in order to accelerate Company growth.

8



  Investments in associated companies decreased from NIS 346.4 million on December 31, 2007 to NIS 318.1 million on December 31, 2008. This decrease, despite the Company’s share in the income of associated companies, amounting to NIS 51.3 million, was primarily due to the initial consolidation of Carmel and Frenkel CD as of September 1, due to a larger holding percentage – which led to the removal of Carmel and of Frenkel CD from the Investments in Associated Companies item, to the amount of NIS 49.8 million, as well as due to the change in net capital reserves, amounting to NIS 28.1 million.

  Short-term credit decreased from NIS 143.0 million on December 31, 2007 to NIS 77.7 million on December 31, 2008. The decrease in this item was primarily due to the use of part of the proceeds from the private placement to the shareholders in November of last year and of proceeds from the offering of bond series in July and August of this year – intended for the repayment of short-term credit.

  Accounts payable and other credit balances in the packaging paper, recycling and cardboard activity increased from NIS 65.8 million as of December 31, 2007, to NIS 100.4 million as of December 31, 2008. This increase is primarily due to the consolidation of accounts payable at Carmel and Frenkel CD, amounting to NIS 18.1 million, to an increase in expenses payable in respect of interest on bonds from issuances during the third quarter, and to the revaluation of the fair value of liabilities in respect of future transactions for hedging payments to suppliers of Machine 8, due to the lower euro exchange rate in 2008. In the office supplies marketing activity, the Other Accounts Payable item increased from NIS 4.8 million on December 31, 2007, to NIS 5.6 million on December 31, 2008.

  The Company’s shareholders’ equity increased from NIS 670.0 million on December 31, 2007, to NIS 757.6 million on December 31, 2008. This change was primarily due to the net profit associated with Company shareholders in 2008, amounting to NIS 69.7 million, to a positive capital reserve from transition to consolidation, amounting to NIS 15.9 million, and to the addition of the minority interest amounting to NIS 26.3 million, offset by an increase in net negative capital reserves, amounting to NIS 24.3 million.

  1. Investments in Fixed Assets

  Investments in fixed assets in 2008 amounted to NIS 230.1 million, as compared with NIS 83.4 million in 2007, with investments in 2008 primarily including payments on account of purchases from equipment vendors for the new packaging paper manufacturing network (Machine 8), amounting to approximately NIS 191 million. Additional investments included were related to environmental protection (wastewater treatment) and current investments in equipment renewal, means of transportation and building maintenance at the Hadera site.

  2. Financial Liabilities

  Long-term liabilities (including current maturities) amounted to NIS 785.3 million as at December 31, 2008, as compared with NIS 260.2 million as at December 31, 2007. Long-term liabilities grew year-over-year, primarily as a result of the issuing of two debenture series (Series 3 and Series 4) in the third quarter of this year, in the total sum of NIS 427 million, coupled with long-term loans assumed intended for financing payments on account of Machine 8 and the consolidation of the loans of Carmel and Frenkel CD, in the total sum of NIS 101.4 million.

9



  The long-term liabilities include primarily four series of debentures and the following long-term bank loans:

  Series 1 – NIS 7.4 million, for repayment until 2009.

  Series 2 – NIS 158.6 million, for repayment until 2013.

  Series 3 – NIS 190.5 million, for repayment until 2018.

  Series 4 – NIS 235.6 million, for repayment until 2020.

  Long-term loans – NIS 159.2 million.

  The balance of short-term credit, as at December 31, 2008, amounted to approximately NIS 77.7 million, as compared with NIS 143.0 million at December 31, 2007.

  3. Financial liabilities at fair value through the statement of income

  Put option for shareholder at an associated company

  As part of an agreement dated November 21, 1999 with Mondi Business Paper (hereinafter – MBP, formerly Neusiedler AG) Mondi Hadera acquired the Group’s operation in fine paper and issued MBP 50.1% of its shares.

  As part of this agreement, MBP was granted the option to sell its holdings in Mondi Hadera to the Company at a price 20% lower than its value (as defined in the agreement), or $20 million, less 20% – the higher of the two. According to verbal understandings that were reached in proximity to the signing of the agreement, between elements at the company and elements at MBP, the latter can exercise the option only in the most exceptional cases, such as those that paralyze production in Israel for long periods of time.

  Due to the extended period of time that has passed since these understandings were reached and in view of recent changes in the management of MBP, the Company has decided to adopt a conservative approach in this respect and to reflect the economic value of the option. The value of the option was calculated according to IFRS and was recognized as a liability that is measured at fair value, with changes in fair value being allocated to the statement of income in accordance with IAS 39.

  The difference between the value of the liabilities according to the agreement – NIS 54.7 million – as compared with the value of the liabilities through fair value – NIS 13.9 million – amounts to NIS 40.8 million.

  The liability on account of the Put option for shareholder at the associated company shares as at December 31, 2008, December 31, 2007, and as at January 1, 2007, amounts to NIS 13.9 million, NIS 3.9 million and NIS 1.6 million, respectively.

  On account of the Put option, other expenses grew by NIS 10.0 million in 2008, as compared with growth of NIS 2.3 million in 2007.

  The principal factors responsible for the change in fair value in 2008 include the change in the risk-free interest rate and the change in the standard deviation of the Hadera Paper share – that serve for calculating the value of the option as a result of fluctuations in the price of the share during 2008 and in the risk-free, dollar-denominated interest rate.

10



C. Results of Operations

  1. Aggregate Data

  Since the Company’s share in the earnings of associated companies constitutes a material component in the company’s statement of income (primarily on account of its share in the earnings of Mondi Hadera PaperLtd. [Mondi Hadera] and Hogla-Kimberly Ltd.), before the presentation of the consolidated data below, the aggregate data which include the results of all the companies in the Hadera Paper Group (including the associated companies whose results appear in the financial statements under “earnings from associated companies”) is being presented, without considering the rate of holding therein and net of mutual sales.

Regarding the consolidated data, see Section (3) below.

  Aggregate Data

  The aggregate sales amounted to NIS 3,229.1 million in 2008, as compared with NIS 3,124.3 million in the corresponding period last year, representing growth of 3.4%.

  Aggregate operating profit in 2008 amounted to NIS 203.0 million, as compared with NIS 183.8 million in 2007 – representing a 10.4% increase. The significant improvement in the aggregate operating profit is attributed to the performance improvement at some of the Israeli companies on the one hand, coupled with the continuing trend of a lower operating loss in Turkey on the other hand.

  For the operations in Turkey – see Section C7 below – Company’s share in the earnings of associated companies.

  2. The net profit and the Earnings per Share Attributed to the Company’s Shareholders

  The net profit attributed to the Company’s shareholders in 2008 amounted to NIS 69.7 million, as compared with net profit of NIS 31.5 million in 2007, representing an increase of 121.3%.

  The net profit attributed to the Company’s shareholders in 2008 was affected by the improvement in the profitability of some of the Group’s companies in Israel, from recording profit from the allocation of excess negative cost as a result of the acquisition of Carmel and Frenkel CD – whose net impact on the net profit attributed to the Company’s shareholders amounted to NIS 10.6 million and the significant reduction of the Company’s share in the losses of the operations in Turkey (KCTR), as compared with 2007 (see Strategic Investment in Turkey, above, and Section C7, below). On the other hand, the net profit decreased as a result of recording an expenditure of NIS 10.0 million from the valuation of a PUT option at Mondi.

  Regarding details of the calculations of the surplus of assets fair value and liabilities resulting from purchasing Carmel, see assessments of the value which were added to the financial statements of the Company dated 30.9.08

11



  The net profit attributed to the shareholders of the company in the fourth quarter this year amounted to NIS 10.2 million, as compared with net profit attributed to the company’s shareholders of NIS 17.5 million in the corresponding quarter last year.

  Basic earnings per share amounted to NIS 13.77 per share ($3.62 per share) in 2008, as compared with basic earnings per share of NIS 7.63 per share ($1.98 per share) in 2007.

  Diluted earnings per share amounted to NIS 13.77 per share ($3.62 per share) in 2008, as compared with diluted earnings per share of NIS 7.62 per share ($1.98 per share) in 2007.

  3. Analysis of Operations and Profitability

  The analysis set forth below is based on the consolidated data.

  1. Sales

  The consolidated sales during 2008 amounted to NIS 673.5 million, as compared with NIS 583.6 million in 2007, representing growth of 15.4%.

  Sales of the packaging paper, recycling and cardboard activity in 2008 amounted to NIS 543.1 million, as compared with NIS 465.3 million in 2007.

  Higher sales in the packaging paper, recycling and cardboard activity were primarily due to the initial consolidation, starting in September, of sales by Carmel and Frenkel CD, amounting to NIS 160.9 million on the one hand, and on the other hand to the decrease in the sales of packaging paper and recycling due to the impact of the weaker dollar on the selling prices, which was not offset by a rise in NIS-denominated prices (segment sales are impacted by dollar-denominated import prices).

  Sales of the Office Supplies Marketing activity in 2008 amounted to NIS 131.1 million, as compared with NIS 119.0 million in 2007, representing growth of 10.2% due to continued implementation of the growth plan in this segment.

  The consolidated sales in the fourth quarter amounted to NIS 226.3 million, as compared with NIS 154.9 million in the corresponding quarter last year, representing an increase of 46.5%, that is primarily attributed to the inclusion of the data of Carmel and Frenkel CD in the fourth quarter, in the sum of NIS 119.9 million, that were not consolidated last year, as mentioned above. Net of the sales of Carmel and Frankel CD, the sales amounted to NIS 106.4 million, primarily as a result of the decrease in the sales of packaging paper as a result of price erosion in dollar terms, coupled with the apparent slowdown in the markets and the global financial crisis.

  2. Cost of Sales

  The cost of sales amounted to NIS 542.4 million – or 80.5% of sales – in 2008, as compared with NIS 440.7 million – or 75.5% of sales – in 2007.

  The gross profit totaled NIS 131.1 million in 2008 (approximately 19.5% of sales), as compared with NIS 142.9 million (24.4% of sales) in 2007, representing a decrease of approximately 8.3% in relation to 2007.

12



  The decrease in the gross profit and gross margin in relation to 2007 is attributed primarily to the erosion of the dollar-linked prices of packaging paper in light of the change in the exchange rate, coupled with a decrease in the quantitative sales on the local market as a result of the impact of the cold spell, the approximately 17% rise in electricity prices and the rise in paper waste collection costs – that were partially offset by the continuing efficiency measures and the transition to manufacture using natural gas. Additionally, the cost of sales included an amortization of approximately NIS 5.5 million in excess cost, as a result of excess cost recorded from the sale of Carmel and Frenkel CD.

  Labor Wages

  The labor wages within the cost of sales amounted to NIS 149.2 million in 2008 (22.3% of sales), as compared with NIS 115.7 million last year (approximately 19.8% of sales).

  The labor wages within the general and administrative expenses amounted to NIS 73.9 million in 2008 (approximately 11.0% of sales), as compared with the sum of NIS 58.3 million last year (approximately 10.0% of sales).

  The Increase in salary costs as compared to 2007 is attributed to additional salary expenses of approximately NIS 50.0 million resulting from the consolidation of Carmel and Frenkel CD and the increase in personal, primarily at Amnir and in the packaging paper sector, as part of the preparations for and the execution of the expanded collection of cardboard and newspaper waste that is to serve the upcoming operation of the new packaging paper manufacturing network, coupled with a nominal increase of 4% in wages.

  Moreover, the labor costs include an increase in labor expenses as detailed in Section 3 below, as a result of expenses derived from the issue of options to executives and the allocation of the expenses thereupon, at an accrued sum of NIS 4.9 million in 2008 – an expenditure that does not involve cash flows.

  As part of the alignment with the global economic crisis, the Company’s management adopted a policy of mutually-agreed pay cuts for executives. In this capacity, senior executives and managers have mutually agreed to cut their wages by 8% to 10% in 2009, while senior employees have agreed that their wages be cut by 5%.

  3. Selling, General and Administrative and Other Expenses

  Selling, general and administrative expenses (including wages) and other expenses in 2008, amounted to NIS 95.7 million – or 14.3% of sales – as compared with NIS 71.8 million – or 12.3% of sales – in 2007. Net of the revenues from attribution of excess negative cost at a subsidiary and non-recurring expenses as set forth below, selling, general and administrative and other expenses amounted to NIS 94.5 million.

The increase in selling, general and administrative and other expenses was primarily attributed to the consolidation of the expenses of Carmel and Frenkel CD in the Company’s financial statements, in the amount of NIS 17.3 million, along with the increase in wages expenses as a result of NIS 4.9 million in wages expenses recorded in respect of the option plan for executives approved in January this year, as well as the increase in other expenses following the revaluation of a Mondi PUT option in the amount of NIS 10.0 million pursuant to IFRS.

13



  The selling, general and administrative expenses amounted to NIS 37.8 million – or 16.7% of sales – in the fourth quarter of the year, as compared with NIS 20.9 million, or 13.5% of sales, in the corresponding quarter last year. The growth is primarily attributed to the inclusion of the expenses of Carmel and Frankel CD in the sum NIS 12.8 million in the quarter, as well as a result of recording an expenditure on account of a PUT option on an associated company, in the sum of approximately NIS 4.3 million in the fourth quarter.

  4. Operating Profit

  The operating profit amounted to NIS 35.4 million – or 5.3% of sales – in 2008, as compared with NIS 71.1 million – or 12.2% of sales – in 2007. Most of the erosion in the profit was due to changes in the dollar exchange rate, which negatively impacted the selling prices of packaging paper and recycling, as well as to the dumping prices of competing imports, as set forth above, coupled with the apparent slowdown in the operations of the various companies during the final quarter as a result of the financial crisis.

  Operating profit for the packaging paper, recycling and cardboard activity in 2008 amounted to approximately NIS 32.1 million, as compared with NIS 70.4 million in 2007 – primarily due to the aforementioned impact of the exchange rate, at which segment sales are denominated, as well as due to the dumping prices of competing imports, as set forth above, and the impact of the severe cold spell on the demand for exported agricultural produce.

  The operating profit of the office supplies operations amounted to NIS 3.2 million, as compared with a profit of NIS 0.7 million in 2007.

  The operating loss amounted to NIS 2.6 million in the fourth quarter of the year, as compared with approximately NIS 18.1 million in the corresponding quarter last year. This is primarily attributable to the decrease in sales for exports as well as the development of recycled products from pulp replacements, the influence of currency and the erosion of selling prices, as well as the result of recording an expenditure on account of a PUT option for an associated company in the sum NIS 4.3 million in the fourth quarter of the year. Net of influence of the Put option and losses from companies consolidated during the quarter, the operating profit for the quarter amounted to approximately NIS 5.5 million.

  5. Financial Expenses

  The financial expenses in 2008 amounted to NIS 15.0 million, as compared with NIS 22.2 million in the corresponding period last year, representing a decrease of 32.4%.

  The total average of net interest-bearing liabilities, charged to the Company’s financial expenses, decreased by approximately NIS 85 million, between 2007 and 2008. This decrease was primarily due to proceeds of the private placement received last year, to the positive cash flows from operating activities in those years, offset by investments in fixed assets.

14



  The interest on the short-term credit decreased by approximately NIS 6.3 million, both as a result of the decrease in the balance of short-term credit and as a result of the lower interest rate between the two periods. The interest expenses in respect of CPI-linked long-term liabilities (debentures) grew by approximately NIS 0.7 million, as compared with 2007, despite the decrease in the balance of debentures following redemptions made to the holders of the debentures both as a result of the increase in the costs of the hedging transactions on the CPI-linked debentures against the increase in the CPI, which grew by an annual rate of 2.6% in 2008, as compared with 1.3% in 2007, and as a result of the valuation of the hedging transactions to their fair value, in accordance with international standards. The actual index rose by approximately 3.8% in this period.

  Furthermore, the Company recorded financial revenues in 2008 amounting to NIS 5.2 million in respect of a dollar currency transaction executed in the third quarter of this year, as compared with financial revenues of NIS 4.6 million from euro currency transactions executed in late 2007. These revenues were offset last year by financial expenses amounting to NIS 2.3 million, primarily due to the impact of the revaluation of the NIS vis-à-vis the USD by 9.0% in 2007, as compared with a 1.1% revaluation in 2008, applicable to USD asset balances.

  6. Taxes on Income

  Expenses on taxes on income amounted to NIS 3.7 million in 2008, as compared with NIS 18.3 million in 2007. The sharp decrease of approximately NIS 14.6 million is primarily attributed to the sharp drop in taxable income (income after financial expenses, net of non-recurring income of approximately NIS 14.6 million from the allocation of a negative excess of cost), the inclusion of NIS 0.9 million in last year’s tax expenses in respect of the closing of assessments for the years 2002 through 2005 and the decrease in the current tax rate this year as compared with the preceding year.

  7. Company’s Share in Earnings of Associated Companies

  The companies whose earnings are reported under this item (according to Hadera Paper’s holdings therein), include primarily: Mondi Hadera, Hogla-Kimberly and Carmel Container Systems (until August 31, 2008 – the date of initial consolidation of the Carmel financial statements).

  The company’s share in the earnings of associated companies totaled NIS 51.3 million in 2008, as compared with NIS 0.9 million in 2007. The Company’s share in the earnings of associated companies amounted to NIS 14.7 million in the fourth quarter of the year, as compared with NIS 7.9 million in the corresponding quarter last year, representing an increase of 86% in relation to the corresponding quarter last year.

  The following principal changes were recorded in the Company’s share in the earnings of associated companies, in relation to 2007:

  The Company’s share in the net profit of Mondi Hadera Paper (49.9%) rose by NIS 0.6 million. The increased income was primarily attributed to the improvement in Mondi’s operating profit, which grew from NIS 33.6 million last year to NIS 34.1 million this year – primarily due to a quantitative increase in sales, operating efficiency and lower energy costs due to the transition to using natural gas at the Hadera site. The net profit also increased as a result of the decrease in financial expenses this year in relation to last year, primarily on account of the impact of the revaluation of the NIS against the dollar.

15



  The company’s share in the net earnings of Hogla-Kimberly Israel (49.9%) increased by approximately NIS 12.3 million. Hogla’s operating profit grew from NIS 136.3 million to NIS 169.0 million this year. The improved operating profit originated from a quantitative increase in sales, improved selling prices net of the impact of higher raw material prices, the continuing implementation of efficiency measures and the continuing trend of raising the proportion of some of the premium products out of the products basket, while innovating products and empowering the Company’s brands.

  The Company’s share in the losses of KCTR Turkey (formerly: “Ovisan”) (49.9%) decreased by NIS 48.0 million. The significant decrease in the loss is attributed to the growth in the volumes of operation (see above – Section A(2)(b)(3)(4) – “Strategic Investment in Turkey”) that led to a significant reduction in the operating loss, from NIS 73.7 million last year to approximately NIS 33.4 million this year. In 2007, the Company recorded a non-recurring loss in respect of termination of trade agreements with distributors following the transition to distribution by Unilever, amounting to approximately NIS 6 million ($1.5 million), of which the Company’s share amounts to approximately NIS 3 million. Moreover, the tax asset that was recorded in previous years in Turkey, in the sum of approximately NIS 26.8 million (approximately $6.4 million) was reduced, of which our share is NIS 13.4 million. Moreover, due to the increase in the shareholders’ equity of KCTR through a financial influx from Hogla, the bank loans were repaid, while significantly reducing the financial expenses, thereby leading to an additional reduction in the net loss.

  The Company’s share in the loss of Carmel (36.21% as at August 31, 2008 – the date of consolidation), increased by NIS 6.4 million. This increase is attributed to the sharp erosion in the operating margin as a result of lower demand for packaging due to the slowdown in industrial exports on account of the erosion of currency exchange rates vis-à-vis the NIS, coupled with the damages of the cold spell in the agricultural sector. On the other hand, the prices of imported raw materials did not decrease in NIS terms, due to hedging transactions on exchange rates.

D. Liquidity

  Cash Flows

  The cash flows from operating activities in 2008 amounted to approximately NIS 113.9 million, as compared with NIS 91.9 million in 2007. The increase in the cash flows from operating activities in 2008, as compared with 2007, originated primarily as a result of the sharp improvement in net profit as well as from the decrease in working capital in 2008, that amounted to approximately NIS 41 million, as compared with a NIS 8.0 million decrease last year. The decrease in working capital in 2008 originated primarily from the reduction in the accounts receivable balance as a result of the lower dollar exchange rate, that is affecting the selling prices in NIS, especially as regards packaging paper and recycling.

E. Sources of Finance

  See Section B2 – Financial Liabilities and in the details of the table below.

16



Debentures for institutional investors and the public

Series
Issue Date
Name of
Rating
Company

Rating
at time
of issue
and at
report
date

Total stated
value at issue
date

Interest
type

Stated
Interest

Registered
for trade
on stock
exchange
(Yes/No)

Interest payment
dates

Nominal par
value as at
Dec-31-08

Book value
of debenture
balances as
at Dec-31-08

Book value of
interest to be
paid as at
Dec-31-08

Market
value as
at Dec-31-08

In NIS
NIS millions
 
Series 1      Apr-1992    Maalot    AA-    48,000,000    Fixed    3.8 %  No    Annual interest On June 10-30 In the years 1993-2009    3.25    7.42    0.1       
   
Series 2     Dec-2003    Maalot    AA-    200,000,000    Fixed    5.65 %  No    Annual interest On December 21 In the years 2004-2013    142.9    158.6    0.3       
   
Series 3     Jul-2007    Maalot    AA-    187,500,000    Fixed    4.65 %  Yes    Annual interest On July 10 In the years 2009-2018    187.5    190.5    4.1    182.4  
   
Series 4     Jul/Aug-2007    Maalot    AA-    235,557,000    Fixed    7.45 %  Yes    Semi-annual interest On January 10 and July 10 In the years 2009-2015    235.6    235.6    8.1    249.6  

  Comments:

  1. Series 1 – Linked to the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Principal repayment ends in June 2009.

  2. Series 2 – Linked to the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Principal repaid in 7 annual installments, between Dec-21-2007 and Dec-21-2013.

  3. Series 3 – Linked to the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Principal repaid in 9 annual installments, between July 2010 and July 2018.

  4. Principal repaid in 6 annual installments, between July 2010 and July 2015.

  5. The trustee of the debentures (Series 2) is Bank Leumi Le-Israel Trust Corporation Ltd. The responsible contact person on behalf of Bank Leumi Le-Israel Trust Corporation Ltd. is Ms. Idit Teuzer (telephone: 03-5170777).

  6. The trustee of the public debentures (Series 3, 4) is Hermetic Trust Corporation (1975) Ltd. The responsible contact people on behalf of Hermetic Trust Corporation (1975) Ltd. are Mr. Dan Avnon and /or Ms. Merav Ofer-Oren (telephone: -3-5272272).

  7. As at the date of the report, the Company has met all of the terms and undertakings of the trust notes and there exist no terms that constitute just cause for demanding the immediate repayment of the debentures.

17



F. Exposure and Management of Market Risks

  1. General

  The Company conducts periodical discussions regarding market risks and exposure to exchange rate and interest rate fluctuations, with the participation of the relevant factors, so as to reach decisions in this matter. The individual responsible for the implementation of market risk management policy at the Company is Israel Eldar, the Company’s Comptroller.

  2. Market Risks to which the Company is Exposed

  Description of Market Risks

  The market risks reflect the risk of changes in the value of financial instruments affected by changes in the interest rate, in the Consumer Price Index and in foreign currency exchange rates.

  Exchange Rate Risks

  Approximately half of the Company’s sales are denominated in US dollars, whereas a significant share of its expenses and liabilities are in NIS. The Company is therefore exposed to fluctuations in the exchange rate of the NIS vis-à-vis the US dollar. This exposure includes economic exposure (on account of surplus proceeds on payments in foreign currency or linked thereto) and accounting exposure (on account of a surplus of dollar-linked assets over foreign-currency-denominated liabilities).

  The Company periodically reexamines the need for hedging on account of this exposure. True to December 31, 2008, the Company entered into hedging transactions in the sum of 25 million euro, in order to hedge the cash flows for the acquisition of fixed assets from equipment vendors for Machine 8.

  Consumer Price Index Risks

  The Company is exposed to changes in the Consumer Price Index, pertaining to the debentures issued by the Company, in the total sum of NIS 356.5 million. In early 2009, the Company entered into hedging transactions for a period of one year, to protect itself against a rise in the CPI, in the amount of NIS 250 million, pursuant to previous transactions that were made in early 2008 and in August 2008 and terminated at the end of 2008.

  Credit Risks

  Most of the Group’s sales are made in Israel to a large number of customers and the exposure to customer-related credit risks is consequently generally limited. The Group regularly analyzes – through credit committees that operate within the various companies – the quality of the customers, their credit limits and the relevant collateral required, as the case may be.

  The financial statements include provisions for doubtful debts, based on the existing risks on the date of the statements.

18



Sensitivity Analysis Tables for Sensitive Instruments, According to Changes in Market Elements as at December 31, 2008:

Sensitivity to Interest Rates
Sensitive Instruments
Profit (loss) from changes
Fair value
As at
Dec-31-08

Profit (loss) from changes
Interest
rise
10%

Interest rise
5%

Interest
decrease
5%

Interest
decrease
10%

In NIS thousands
 
Series 1 Debentures      (16 )  (8 )  (7,537 )  8    16  
Series 2 Debentures    (1,866 )  (937 )  (155,637 )  947    1,903  
Series 3 Debentures    (3,979 )  (2,005 )  (195,959 )  2,037    4,105  
Series 4 Debentures    (3,956 )  (1,990 )  (269,078 )  2,013    4,050  
Other liabilities    (134 )  (57 )  (31,359 )  68    136  
Long-term loans and capital  
notes - granted    212    106    49,355    (106 )  (213 )

The fair value of the loans is based on a calculation of the present value of the cash flows, according to the generally-accepted interest rate on loans with similar characteristics (4.5% in 2008).

Regarding the terms of the debentures and other liabilities – See Note 8 to the financial statements

Regarding long-term loans and capital notes granted – See Note 4 to the financial statements

Sensitivity of €-linked instruments to changes in the(euro)exchange rate
Sensitive Instruments
Profit (loss) from changes
Fair value as
at
Dec-31-08

Profit (loss) from changes
Rise in €
10%

Rise in €
5%

Decrease in

5%

Decrease in €
10%

In NIS thousands
 
Cash and cash equivalents      268    134    2,681    (134 )  (268 )
Designated deposits    12,575    6,287    125,747    (6,287 )  (12,575 )
Other Accounts Receivable    321    160    3,206    (160 )  (321 )
Supplier engagement  
transaction - Alstom    (92 )  (46 )  (922 )  46    92  
Other Accounts Payable    (2,397 )  (1,198 )  (23,969 )  1,198    2,397  
PUT options    -    -    (836 )  (2,088 )  (3,412 )
NIS- € forward transaction    12,293    6,996    1,304    (3,599 )  (8,896 )

19



Sensitivity to the US Dollar Exchange Rate
Sensitive Instruments
Profit (loss) from changes
Fair value as
at
Dec-31-08

Profit (loss) from changes
Revaluation
of $
10%

Revaluation of
$
5%

Devaluation
of $
10%

Devaluation of
$
5%

In NIS thousands
 
Cash and cash equivalents      233    116    2,327    (116 )  (233 )
Other Accounts Receivable    1,472    736    14,722    (736 )  (1,472 )
Accounts Payable    (3,246 )  (1,623 )  (32,549 )  1,623    3,246  

Other accounts receivable reflect primarily short-term customer debts.

Capital note – See Note 4d to the financial statements.

Accounts payable reflect primarily short-term liabilities to suppliers.

20



Sensitivity Analysis Tables for Sensitive Instruments, According to Changes in Market Elements as at December 31, 2007:

Sensitivity to Interest Rates
Sensitive Instruments
Profit (loss) from changes
Fair value
As at
Dec-31-07

Profit (loss) from changes
Interest
rise
10%

Interest rise
5%

Interest
decrease
5%

Interest
decrease
10%

In NIS thousands
 
Series 1 Debentures      (54 )  (27 )  (14,336 )  27    54  
Series 2 Debentures    (2,370 )  (1,191 )  (191,537 )  1,203    2,417  
Other liabilities    (121 )  (60 )  (31,510 )  61    122  
Long-term loans and capital  
notes - granted    186    93    48,644    (188 )  (94 )

The fair value of the loans is based on a calculation of the present value of the cash flows, according to the generally-accepted interest rate on loans with similar characteristics (4% in 2007).

Regarding the terms of the debentures and other liabilities – See Note 8 to the financial statements

Regarding long-term loans and capital notes granted –See Note 4 to the financial statements

Sensitivity of € -linked instruments to changes in the € exchange rate
Sensitive Instruments
Profit (loss) from changes
Fair value as
at
Dec-31-07

Profit (loss) from changes
Rise in €
10%

Rise in €
5%

Decrease in
(euro)
5%

Decrease in €
10%

In NIS thousands
 
NIS- € forward transaction      (6,038 )  (4,028 )  (994 )  3,741    8,439  

See Note 12a to the financial statements.

Sensitivity to the US Dollar Exchange Rate
Sensitive Instruments
Profit (loss) from changes
Fair value as
at
Dec-31-07

Profit (loss) from changes
Revaluation
of $
10%

Revaluation of
$
5%

Devaluation
of $
10%

Devaluation of
$
5%

In NIS thousands
 
Other Accounts Receivable      1,272    636    12,720    (636 )  (1,272 )
Capital note    242    121    2,421    (121 )  (242 )
Accounts Payable    (1,036 )  (518 )  (10,363 )  518    1,036  

Other accounts receivable reflect primarily short-term customer debts.

Capital note – See Note 4d to the financial statements.

Accounts payable reflect primarily short-term liabilities to suppliers.

21



Linkage Base Report

Below are the balance sheet items, according to linkage bases, as at December 31, 2008:

NIS millions
Unlinked
CPI-linked
In foreign
currency, or
linked thereto
(primarily US$)

€ -linked
Non-Monetary
Items

Total
 
Assets                            
   
Cash and cash equivalents     8.1         2.3    2.7         13.1  
Short-term deposits and investments     123.9              125.7         249.6  
Other Accounts Receivable     396.0    0.9    15.8    3.2    3.9    419.8  
Inventories                         168.8    168.8  
Current tax assets     6.3                        6.3  
Investments in Associated Companies     53.0                   265.1    318.1  
Deferred taxes on income                         29.8    29.8  
Fixed assets, net                         767.6    767.6  
Intangible Assets                         31.5    31.5  
Other assets                         38.9    38.9  
Assets on account of employee benefits     0.6                        0.6  
   
Total Assets     587.9    0.9    18.1    131.6    1,305.6    2,044.1  






   
Liabilities   
Short-term credit from banks     77.7                        77.7  
Other Accounts Payable     240.3         36.8    24.0         301.1  
Financial liability at fair value through the   
statement of income               13.9              13.9  
Deferred taxes on income                             76.6    76.6
Long-term loans, including current maturities     124.0    35.2                   159.2  
Notes (debentures) - including current   
maturities     238.6    354.7                   593.3  
Liabilities on account of employee benefits     31.9                        31.9  
Other Liabilities     32.8                        32.8  
Equity, funds and reserves                         757.6    757.6  
Total liabilities and equity     745.3    389.9    50.7    24.0    834.2    2,044.1  






Surplus financial assets (liabilities) as at   
Dec-31-2008       (157.4 )   (389.0 )   (12.6 )   107.6     471.4        

        * As to hedging transactions associated with surplus CPI-linked liabilities, see Section F(2), above.

22



Linkage Base Report

Below are the balance sheet items, according to linkage bases, as at December 31, 2007:

NIS millions
Unlinked
CPI-linked
In foreign
currency, or
linked
thereto
(primarily
US$)

€ -linked
Non-Monetary
Items

Total
 
Assets                            
    
Cash and cash equivalents     2.6         7.4    157.7         167.7       
Other Accounts Receivable     259.8    0.5    10.9    1.8         273.0       
Inventories                         69.6    69.6  
Investments in Associated Companies     52.2         2.4         291.8    346.4  
Deferred taxes on income                         20.6    20.6  
Fixed assets, net                         405.2    405.2  
Intangible Assets                         1.6    1.6  
Other assets                         34.9    34.9  
Assets on account of employee benefits     0.9                        0.9  
Total Assets     315.5    0.5    20.7    159.5    823.7    1,319.9  






    
Liabilities   
Credit from Banks     143.0                        143.0  
Other Accounts Payable     164.7         11.7    2.6         179.0  
Financial liability at fair value
through the statement of income
              3.9              3.9  
Deferred taxes on income                         40.5    40.5  
Long-Term Loans     33.5                        33.5  
Notes (debentures)          195.5                   195.5  
Liabilities on account of employee     22.4                        22.4  
benefits                                 
Other liabilities - including current                                 
maturities     31.2                        31.2  
Current tax liabilities                         0.9    0.9  
Equity, funds and reserves                         670.0    670.0  
Total liabilities and equity     394.8    195.5    15.6    2.6    711.4    1,319.9  






Surplus financial assets (liabilities)    
as at Dec-31-2007       (79.3 )   (195.0 )   (4.9 )   156.9     112.3        


23



  Associated Companies

  Hadera Paper is exposed to various risks associated with operations in Turkey, where Hogla-Kimberly is active through its subsidiary, KCTR. These risks originate from concerns regarding economic and political instability, high devaluation and elevated inflation rates that have characterized the Turkish economy in the past and that may recur and harm the KCTR operations.

G. Forward-Looking Statements

  This report contains various forecasts that constitute forward-looking statements, as defined in the Securities Law, based upon the Board of Directors’ present expectations and estimates regarding the operations of the Group and its business environment. The Company does not guarantee that the future results of operations will coincide with the forward-looking statements and these may in fact differ considerably from the present forecasts as a result of factors that may change in the future, such as changes in costs and market conditions, failure to achieve projected goals, failure to achieve anticipated efficiencies and other factors which lie outside the control of the Company. The Company undertakes no obligation to publicly update such forward-looking statements, regardless of whether these updates originate from new information, future events or any other reason.

H. Donations and Contributions

  The Hadera Paper Group, within the framework of its business and social commitment, invests efforts and funds in community assistance and support, while focusing on providing help to the weaker echelons of Israeli society – and primarily teenagers.

  As part of this policy, the Company makes contributions to various institutions active in the said areas. The Group’s contributions and activity through the Shenkar Foundation amounted to NIS 456 thousand in 2008.

In parallel, through its employees, the Company also participates in volunteer activity in the community, for promoting these same objectives.

  This year the company focused on donations to youth clubs, community centers operating in the afternoons – with the intention of fortifying and enriching teenagers while granting them a proper opportunity. During this year assistance was provided to two projects: children's club in the Eastern Worker neighborhood of Hadera and youth studying centers in Hadera.

  Moreover the company is active in the granting of student scholarships, through the Shenkar Foundation, that was established by the company together with its Austrian strategic partner in Mondi Hadera. The total contributions of the company through the Shenkar Foundation amounted to NIS 90 thousand.

24



I. Members of the Board of Directors Possessing Financial Skills and Qualifications

  The minimum number of company directors possessing accounting and financial qualifications and skills was determined to be two for the company, in consideration of the nature of the accounting and financial issues that are raised in the preparation of the company’s financial statements, in view of the company’s areas of operation and in consideration of the composition of the board of directors as a whole, that includes individuals possessing business, management and professional experience that enables them to deal effectively with the tasks of managing the company, including reporting duties.

  The members of the company’s board of directors who possess accounting and financial qualifications and skills are:

  Avi Yehezkel  – Holds a degree in Economics from Tel Aviv University and a Masters’degree in Law from Bar-Ilan University. External director at Bank Yahav. Served as a Knesset member between 1992-2003, also served as Chairman of the Economics Committee, Chairman of the Defense Budget Committee, Chairman of the Capital Market Sub-Committee, Chairman of the Banking Sub-Committee and member of the Finance Committee.

  Ari Bronshtein  – Holds a Bachelor's degree in Management and Economics from Tel Aviv University and a  Master’s degree in Management, Accounting and Finance from Tel Aviv University. Serves as VP of Discount Investments Ltd.; Director at Elron Electronic Industries Ltd. Former VP of Economics and Business Development and Director of Finance and Investments at Bezeq –The Israel Telecommunications Company Ltd.

  Itzhak Manor  – Holds an MBA from Hebrew University. Serves as director at various publicly-traded and privately-held companies within the IDB Group; Chairman of companies in the David Lubinsky Group Ltd.; member of the Balance Sheet Committee at Israel Union Bank Ltd.

  Amos Mar-Haim  – Holds a BA in economics and an MBA from Hebrew University. Formerly served and currently serves as Chairman or Deputy Chairman at publicly-traded or privately-held companies. Member of the Israeli Accounting Standards Board.

  Amir Makov  – Holds a Law degree from Hebrew University and an Engineering degree from the Haifa Technion.Serves as Chairman of the Israel Petroleum and Gas Institute, served as CEO of Haifa Chemicals Ltd., Sonol Israel Ltd.. Served and serves as a director of various publicly-traded and privately-held companies including Leumi Card Ltd., Dead Sea Works Ltd., Dead Sea Bromine Ltd. and more.

25



J. The Company’s Internal Auditor

  a. Auditor’s Name: Eli Greenbaum
In the position since: July 16, 2006
Credentials: CPA

  b. The Auditor is employed by the Company.

  c. The Company’s Audit Committee has approved the appointment of the Auditor on March 7, 2006. The Auditor is a CPA by training and has dealt in Treasury positions at the Company for 20 years and consequently possesses the necessary skills for the job.

  d. The Internal Auditor is supervised by the General Manager.

  e. The work plan for internal auditing is annual. The work plan is determined on the basis of: A five-year plan, covering numerous issues that were approved by the Audit Committee according to the auditing needs of the Company and covers issues that the Internal Auditor believes warrant his examination and consideration in the course of the current year. The work plan is determined by the Internal Auditor and the Audit Committee. The work plan is approved by the Audit Committee. The judgment of the Internal Auditor in terms of deviations from the audit program, subject to the approval of the Company’s Audit Committee. The Internal Auditor participated in a meeting of the Audit Committee that discussed and approved an engagement in the form of a rental agreement with Gav-Yam, Bayside Land Corporation Ltd., a publicly-traded company indirectly controlled by the Company’s controlling shareholder. For further details, see the Company’s reports dated September 25, 2008.

  f. The Internal Auditing program includes auditing topics in corporations that constitute significant holdings of the Company.

  g. Scope of employment: Full-time job as Auditor, plus an assistant. The auditing hours number a total of 370 monthly hours, totaling 4,100 hours annually, divided equally between the corporation and its investee companies:

Audited body
Estimated hours of audit annually
 
Internal auditing at the Company 370 hours
Auditing at investee companies 3,730 hours
Total hours 4,100 hours

  The internal auditor conducts his audit in accordance with acceptable professional standards for internal audit in Israel and overseas, and according to the Company’s Board of Directors, based on the assessment of the Company’s Audit Committee, the internal auditor complies with the requirements set forth in those standards.

  h. The Company declares that it has granted the Internal Auditor free, constant and direct access to all the information at the disposal of the Company and the investee companies.

26



  i. Audit reports were submitted in writing and discussed on the following dates:

Submitted
Discussed
 
Mar-6-08 Mar-10-08
May-6-08 May-11-08
Aug-5-08 Aug-7-08
Nov-6-08 Nov-10-08

  j. The scope of employment of the Internal Auditor is determined according to a cycle that renders it possible to audit all the significant topics at the Company, once every few years.

  This scope of activity, the nature, the continuity of operation and the work plan of the Internal Auditor – are reasonable – according to the estimation of the Company’s Audit Committee, while rendering it possible to realize the Internal Audit objectives of the organization.

  k. The Auditor is employed by the Company. The Board of Directors believes that the compensation received by the Internal Auditor does not influence his professional judgment.

K. Senior Employee Compensation

  In determining the compensation and bonuses of senior employees, the directors and Compensation Committee took into consideration the position and standing of each executive and his contribution to the operations and business of the Company. Labor wage expenses and benefits granted to senior executives and position holders are reasonable and reflect the company’s accomplishments, based on its results as compared with 2007 and as compared with market standards.

  The implementation of IFRS in the financial statements had a negative impact on the financial statements for 2008, see Section C(3)3, above.

  In January 2008, the board of directors decided to adopt a senior employee stock option plan. In the first quarter of 2008, a sum of 250,500 stock options were allocated to senior employees at associated and consolidated companies, and on January 8, 2009 – a sum of 34,000 options were granted, out of the 35,250 allocated to the trustee, for future granting to the Group. Total general expenses for this program are estimated at NIS 15.5 million. The plan’s impact on the consolidated financial statements is estimated at NIS 13.8 million.

  As part of the alignment with the global economic crisis, the Company’s management adopted a policy of mutually-agreed pay cuts for executives. In this framework, the senior executives and position holders mutually consent to waiving between 8% and 10% of their wages in 2009.

27



L. Auditing CPA Fees

  Current Fees

  In 2008, fees paid to the Company’s auditing CPA, inclusive of audit services –including audits of internal auditing for financial reporting – amounted to approximately $326 thousand, compared to $312 thousand in 2007. The hours invested by the auditing CPAs on account of these services amounted to 7,190 hours and 7,800 hours in the years 2008 and 2007, respectively.

  Below are details of the total fee payable to the auditing CPA of the Company and its subsidiaries in the reported year and in the preceding year:

2008
2007
Thousands
of $

Hours
Thousands
of $

Hours
 
Corporate auditing and auditing of tax reports for                    
the company (including shelf prospectus in 2008).    206,000    5,140    150,000    4,510  
Auditing of internal auditors    73,000    1,200    120,000    2,400  
IFRS Auditing services    -    -    22,000    440  
Miscellaneous    46,800    850    20,000    450  
Total    325,800    7,190    312,000    7,800  

M. External Directors

  The Company chose not to adopt in its Article of Association provision with regard to the percentage of external board members.

N. Negligibility procedure

  1. On August 5, 2008, the amendment to Securities Regulations (Periodic and Immediate Reports), 1970 (hereinafter: “the Periodic Report regulations”) became effective. In conjunction with this amendment, reporting requirements applicable to public companies in respect of transactions with a controlling shareholder or transactions with another person in which a controlling shareholder has a personal interest (hereinafter: “transactions with a controlling shareholder”) were expanded to also include transactions which are not exceptional transactions, as defined by the Companies Law, except for transactions classified as negligible in the most recent financial statements.

  On March 8, 2009, the Company’s Board of Directors resolved to adopt rules and guidelines for categorizing a transaction of the Company or of one of its consolidated subsidiaries – with a controlling shareholder (“controlling shareholder transaction”) – as a negligible transaction as set forth in Regulation 64(3)(d)(1) of the Securities Regulations (Preparation of Annual Financial Statements), 1993. These rules and guidelines shall also serve to examine the extent of disclosure in the periodical reports and the prospectus ( including shelf prospectus reports) regarding a transaction of the Company, Corporation under its control and any affiliated company, with a controlling shareholder, or in whose approval a controlling shareholder possesses a personal interest, as set forth in Regulation 22 of the Periodic Report Regulations and in Regulation 54 of the Securities Regulations ( Prospectus Details and Prospectus Draft – Form and Shape) – 1969, as well as for the purpose of submitting an immediate report regarding a said transaction of the company, as stipulated in Regulation 37(a)(6) of the Periodic Report Regulations.

28



  2. The Company and its consolidated and affiliated companies, in the normal course of their business, execute or may execute transactions with interested parties, as well as undertakings to conduct transactions with interested parties in relation to the purchase or sale of products or services, including transactions of the following types and having the following attributes: Transactions related to money management deposited with Provident Funds and Continuing Education Funds, telecommunication services, leasing and rental of real estate assets, financial services (including portfolio management and investment consulting), banking services, economic consulting services, tourism services, advertising and marketing campaigns, legal services, purchasing, purchase and rental of vehicles, vehicle garage services, waste treatment, archive services, dispatch services, administrative services and engagements with equipment vendors for regular use, product sales, rental of heavy mechanical equipment, transportation services and earthwork, purchasing gift coupons and various types of insurance.

  3. In the absence of any special qualitative considerations arising from the circumstances, a transaction with an interested party shall be deemed negligible if it is not an exceptional transaction and if the applicable benchmark calculated for (one or more) transactions is less than one percent (1%).

  Any interested party transaction classified as a negligible transaction, one or more of the criterions relevant to the specific transaction will be calculated based on the recent annual consolidated financial statements of the Company: (a) Sales ratio – total sales covered by the interested party transaction divided by total annual sales; (b) Sales cost ratio – cost of the interested party transaction divided by the total cost of annual sales; (c) Earnings ratio – the actual or projected profit or losses attributed to the interested party transaction divided by the average annual profit or loss in the last three years, calculated on the basis of the last 12 quarters for which reviewed or audited financial statements were published; (d) Assets ratio – the amount of assets covered by the interested party transaction divided by total assets; (e) Liabilities ratio – the liability covered by the interested party transaction divided by total liabilities;

  Thus, for example, the applicable benchmark for a transaction involving the purchase of goods or services would typically be the ratio of cost of sales.

  In cases where, at the Company’s discretion, all the aforementioned quantitative benchmarks are not applicable for evaluation of the negligibility of the transaction with an interested party, the transaction shall be deemed negligible, in accordance with another applicable benchmark to be determined by the Company, provided that the applicable benchmark calculated for said transaction is less than one percent (1%).

  4. The negligibility of the transaction should also be reviewed in qualitative aspects; thus, for example, a transaction with an interested party shall not usually be deemed negligible if it is conceived as a significant event by the Company’s management, and if it serves as a basis for making managerial decisions, or if in the course of the transaction with an interested party, the latter is expected to receive benefits which are important to disclose publicly.

29



  5. The negligibility of a transaction will be examined on an annual basis for the purpose of reporting within the framework of a periodical report, financial statements and a prospectus (including shelf prospectus reports), while consolidating all of the transactions of the same type with the relevant controlling shareholder, or with corporations controlled by the same shareholder. For the purposes of immediate reporting, the negligibility of the transaction will be examined as a single transaction provided that separate transactions, that are in fact interconnected, and that are in fact part of the same engagement (for example: conducting negotiations regarding the entirety of the transactions), shall be examined as a single transaction. It is hereby clarified that separate transactions made frequently and repeatedly every period, that are not interconnected (such as the purchase of inventories every period from a controlling shareholder, on the basis of ad hoc orders, and where there exists no undertaking for the said purchase), shall be examined on an annual basis for the purpose of reporting as part of a periodical report, financial statements and a prospectus (including shelf prospectus reports) and on the basis of the specific transaction for the purposes of immediate reporting. In general, the Company shall assume that all of the transactions classifiers negligible by its investee companies, are indeed negligible at the Company level as well.

O. Detailed processes undertaken by the Company’s supreme supervisors, prior to the approval of the financial statements

  The Company’s Board of Directors has appointed the Company’s Audit Committee to serve as a Balance Sheet Committee and to supervise the completeness of the financial statements and the work of the CPAs and to offer recommendations regarding the approval of the financial statements and the discussion thereof prior to said approval. The Committee consists of three directors, of which two possess accounting and financial expertise. The meetings of the Balance Sheet Committee, as well as the board meetings during which the financial statements are discussed and approved, are attended by the company’s auditing CPAs, who are instructed to present the principal findings – if there are any – that surfaced during the audit or review process, as well as by the Internal Auditor.

  The Committee conducts its examination via detailed presentations from company executives and others, including: CEO – Avi Brener, and CFO – Shaul Glicksberg. The material issues in the financial reports, including any extraordinary transactions – if any, the material assessments and critical estimates implemented in the financial statements, the reasonability of the data, the financial policy implemented and the changes therein, as well as the implementation of proper disclosure in the financial statements and the accompanying information. The Committee examines various aspects of risk assessment and control, as reflected in the financial statements (such as reporting of financial risks), as well as those affecting the reliability of the financial statements. In case necessary, the Committee demands to receive comprehensive reviews of matters with especially relevant impact, such as the implementation of international standards.

30



  The approval of the financial statements involves several meetings, as necessary: The first is held by the Audit Committee to discuss the material reporting issues in depth and at great length, whereas the second is held by the Board of Directors to discuss the actual results. Both meetings are held in proximity to the approval date of the financial statements. As to the supreme supervision regarding the impact of the transition to international financial reporting standards, the Committee held a detailed discussion regarding the said disclosure and the accounting policy implemented in its respect.


By: /s/ Zvika Livnat
——————————————
Zvika Livnat
Chairman of the Board of Directors

By: /s/ Avi Brener
——————————————
Avi Brener
General Manager

31



Exhibit 3

HADERA PAPER LTD

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2008



HADERA PAPER LTD

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2008

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
 
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM F-2
CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS:
    Balance sheets F-3
    Statements of income F-4
    Statements of Recognized Income and expenses F-5
    Statements of cash flows F-6-F-7
    Notes to financial statements F-8-F-97



HADERA PAPER LTD

  Brightman Almagor Zohar
Haifa Office
5 Ma'aleh Hashichrur Street
Haifa, 33284
P.O.B. 5648, Haifa 31055
Israel
 
Tel: +972 (4) 860 7373
Fax: +972 (4) 867 2528
Info-haifa@deloitte.co.il
www.deloitte.com

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the shareholders of
Hadera Paper ltd.

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Hadera Paper Ltd. (“the Company”) as of December 31, 2008 and 2007, and the related consolidated statements of operations, consolidated statement of recognized income and expenses and consolidated cash flows of the Company for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2008. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s board of directors and management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit.

We did not audit the financial statements of certain subsidiaries, whose assets constitute approximately 20% of total consolidated assets as of December 31, 2008, and whose revenues constitute approximately 25% of total consolidated revenues for the year ended December 31, 2008.

Likewise we did not audit the financial statements of certain associated companies, the Company’s interest in which as reflected in the balance sheets as of December 31, 2007 is 45,933 Thousands NIS, and the Company’s share in their profits or losses is a net amount of 1,440 and 7,627 Thousands NIS, for the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007 respectively. The financial statements of those companies were audited by other Independent registered Public Accounting Firms whose reports have been furnished to us, and our opinion, insofar as it relates to amounts included for those companies, is based solely on the reports of the other independent auditors.

We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in Israel including those prescribed by the Israeli Auditors (Mode of Performance) Regulations, 1973 and the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by the Company’s board of directors and management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits and the reports of the other independent auditors provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, based on our audit and the reports of other independent auditors, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company and its subsidiaries as of December 31, 2008 and 2007, and the results of operations, changes in shareholders’ equity and cash flows of the Company on consolidated basis, for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2008, in conformity with international financial reporting standards and in accordance with the Israeli Securities Regulations (Preparation of Annual Financial Statements), 1993.

Brightman Almagor & Co.
Certified Public Accountants
A Member Firm of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu

Tel-Aviv, Israel
      March 11, 2009

F - 2



HADERA PAPER LTD

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

December 31
Note
2 0 0 8
2 0 0 7
NIS in thousands
 
Current Assets                
    Cash and cash equivalents    2e    13,128    167,745  
    Designated deposits    2e    249,599    -  
    Accounts receivable:    13a            
       Trade receivables         318,926    178,553  
       Other receivables         100,888    94,415  
    Current tax assets         6,271    -  
    Inventories    13b    168,755    69,607  


              857,567     510,320  


Non-Current Assets    
    Fixed assets    5    767,542    405,231  
    Investments in associated companies    4    318,101    346,403  
    Deferred tax assets    11    29,848    20,622  
    Deferred lease expenses    6    36,344    34,900  
    Other intangible assets    7    31,519    1,578  
    Other assets         2,549    -  
    Employee benefit assets    9    624    861  


              1,186,527     809,595  


              2,044,094     1,319,915  


Current Liabilities    
    Credit from banks    8b, 13c    77,655    143,015  
    Current maturities of long-term notes and long term loans    8a, b    76,469    42,775  
    Trade payables    13d    195,020    108,409  
    Other payables and accrued expenses    13d    106,062    70,585  
    Other financial liabilities    8c    32,770    -  
    Financial liabilities at fair value through profit and loss    2p(2)    13,904    3,901  
    Current tax liabilities         -    908  


              501,880     369,593  


Non-Current Liabilities    
    Loans from banks and others    8b    121,910    28,127  
    Notes    8a    554,124    158,134  
    Other financial liabilities    8c    -    31,210  
    Deferred tax liabilities    11    76,641    40,515  
    Employee benefit liabilities    9    31,910    22,365  


                                                                                                784,585   280,351


Capital and reserves       10              
   Issued capital         125,267    125,267  
   Reserves         299,949    308,267  
   Retained earnings         306,097    236,437  


   Capital and reserves attributed to shareholders             731,313     669,971  
   Minority Interests         26,316    -  
   Total capital and reserves             757,629     669,971  


              2,044,094     1,319,915  




————————————————
Z. Livnat
Chairman of the Board of Directors

————————————————
A. Brener
Chief Executive Officer

————————————————
S. Gliksberg
Chief Financial and Business
Development Officer

Approval date of the financial statements: March 11, 2009.

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements

F - 3



HADERA PAPER LTD

CONSOLIDATED INCOME STATEMENTS

Year ended
December 31

Note
2 0 0 8
2 0 0 7
NIS in thousands
 
Revenue      13e    673,484    583,650  
Cost of sales    13f    542,387    440,739  


   
Gross profit             131,097     142,911  


     13g            
Selling, marketing, general and administrative expenses    
Selling and marketing expenses         45,674    31,344  
   
General and administrative expenses         54,970    35,991  
   
Other (income) expenses, net    13k    (4,898 )  4,467  


   
Total expenses             95,746     71,802  


   
Profit from ordinary operations             35,351     71,109  


   
Finance income         12,069    10,648  
Finance expenses         27,112    32,817  


   
Finance expenses, net       13j     15,043     22,169  


Profit after financial expenses             20,308     48,940  
   
Share in profit of associated companies, net    4    51,315    856  


Profit before taxes on income             71,623     49,796  
   
Taxes on income    11    3,663    18,261  


   
Profit for the year             67,960     31,535  
   
Attributed to:    
Company shareholders         69,710    31,535  
Minority interests         (1,750 )  -  
   
              67,960     31,535  



NIS
 
Earning for regular share of NIS 0.01 par value (see note 14):            
Primary attributed to Company shareholders    13.77    7.63  


   
Fully diluted attributed to company shareholders    13.77    7.62  


   
Number of share used to compute the primary earnings per share    5,060,774    4,132,728  


   
Number of share used to compute the fully diluted earnings per share    5,060,774    4,139,533  



The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements

F - 4



HADERA PAPER LTD

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT
OF RECOGNIZED INCOME AND EXPENSES

Year ended
December 31

Note
2 0 0 8
2 0 0 7
NIS in thousands
 
Exchange differences arising on translation of foreign operations      10    (25,996 )  3,810  
Profit (loss) on cash flow hedges, net    10    (5,564 )  (652 )
Actuarial profit (loss) and defined benefit plans, net    10    (1,808 )  -  
Reevaluation from step acquisition    10    17,288    -  


Net income (loss) recognized directly in equity         (16,080 )  3,158  


Transfer to profit or loss from equity on cash flow hedges, net    10    1,467    17  
Profit for the year    67,960  31,535


Total recognized income and expense for the period         53,347    34,710  


   
Attributed to:   
Company shareholders         55,115    34,710  
Minority interests         (1,768 )  -  


          53,347    34,710  



The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements

F - 5



HADERA PAPER LTD

CONSOLIDATED CASH FLOWS STATEMENTS

Year ended
December 31

2 0 0 8
2 0 0 7
NIS in thousands
 
Cash flows - operating activities            
   Net Profit for the year    67,960    31,535  
   Taxes on income recognized in profit and loss    3,663    18,261  
   Finance expenses recognized in profit and loss    15,043    22,169  
   Capital loss on sale of fixed assets    (284 )  1,403  
   Capital loss on sale investment in associated company    -    28  
   Share in profit of associated companies    (51,315 )  (856 )
   Depreciation and amortization    59,784    36,138  
   Share based payments expense    4,913    -  
   Gain from negative goodwill    (14,664 )  -  


        85,100     108,678  


   
Changes in assets and liabilities:    
   Decrease (Increase) in trade and other receivables    66,805    (5,416 )
   Increase in inventories    (19,868 )  (7,498 )
   Increase (Decrease) in trade and other payables    (15,804 )  18,646  
   Increase in financial liabilities at fair value through profit and loss    10,003    2,289  
   Increase (Decrease) in employee benefit liabilities    (4,182 )  2,913  


        36,954     10,934  


   
        Tax Payments    (8,182 )  (27,755 )


   
      Net cash generated by operating activities       113,872     91,857  



The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements

F - 6



HADERA PAPER LTD

CONSOLIDATED CASH FLOWS STATEMENTS

Year ended
December 31

2 0 0 8
2 0 0 7
NIS in thousands
 
Cash flows - investing activities            
   Acquisition of fixed assets    (230,053 )  (83,363 )
   Acquisition of subsidiaries    (70,567 )  -  
   Proceeds from sales of fixed assets    825    31,415  
   Investment in designated deposits    (255,244 )  -  
   Interest received    7,764    1,716  
   Prepaid leasing expenses    (2,622 )  (2,596 )
   Acquisition of other assets    (2,770 )  -  
   Associated companies:  
   Granting of loans and shares purchasing    (422 )  (318 )
   Collection of loans    2,851    2,893  
   Proceeds from sale of investment of associated companies    -    27,277  


   Net cash used in investing activities       (550,238 )   (22,976 )


   
Cash flows - financing activities    
   Proceeds from private share allocating    -    211,645  
   Proceeds from issuing notes    424,617    -  
   Short-term bank credit - net    (111,444 )  (59,988 )
   Borrowings received from banks    39,448    -  
   Repayment of borrowings from banks    (11,801 )  (5,212 )
   Interest Paid    (20,360 )  (24,994 )
   Redemption of notes    (38,904 )  (37,167 )


   
   Net cash generated by financing activities       281,556     84,284  


   
   Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents       (154,810 )   153,165  
   Cash and cash equivalents beginning of period    167,745    13,621  
   Net foreign exchange difference    193    959  


   Cash and cash equivalents end of period       13,128     167,745  



The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements

F - 7



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 1 DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS AND GENERAL

  A. Description Of Business

  Hadera Paper Limited (former – American Israeli Paper Mills Limited) and its subsidiaries (hereafter – the Company) are engaged in the production and sale of paper packaging, in paper recycling activities and in the marketing of office supplies. The Company also has holdings in associated companies that are engaged in the productions and sale of paper and paper products including the handling of solid waste (the Company and its investee companies – hereafter – the Group). Most of the Group’s sales are made on the local (Israeli) market. For segment information, see note 19.

  B. Definitions:

The Company - Hadera Paper Limited.
 
The Group - the Company and its Subsidiaries.
 
Related Parties - as defined by IAS 24.
 
Interested Parties - as defined in the Israeli Securities law and Regulations 1968.
 
Controlling Shareholder - as defined in the Israeli Securities law and Regulations 1968.
 
NIS - New Israeli Shekel.
 
CPI - the Israeli consumer price index.
 
Dollar - the U.S. dollar.
 
Subsidiaries - companies in which the Company control, (as defined by IAS 27) directly or indirectly, and whose financial statements are fully consolidated with those of the Company.
 
Associated Companies - companies in which the Group has significant influence, and the Group investments in them, directly or indirectly are included in the financial statements using the equity method.
 
Affiliated Companies - Subsidiaries and associated companies.

F - 8



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

  A. Applying International Accounting Standards (IFRS)

  (1) Basis of preparation

  The consolidated financial statements have been prepared using accounting policies consistent with International Financial Reporting Standards (hereafter – IFRS).

  The principal accounting policies described in the following notes were applied in accordance to the IFRS, in a manner consistent with previous reporting periods presented in these consolidated financial statements and in accordance to the opening balance sheet.

  (2) First term IFRS standards adoption

  According to standard No. 29 “Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards”– IFRS (“standard No. 29”), the Company applies International Financial Reporting Standards and interpretations of the committee of the International Accounting Standard Board (IASB) Starting January 1, 2008.

  In compliance with the above mentioned, the consolidated financial statements, as of December 31, 2008 and for the year then ended, have been prepared under accounting policies consistent with International are the first consolidated Financial Reporting Standards.

  In these consolidated financial statements the Company applied IFRS 1 – “First time Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards” (“IFRS No. 1”), which determines instructions for first time implementation of IFRS.

  According to IFRS No. 1 the effective date for implementing IFRS standards is commencing January 1, 2007.

  The Company has applied in a retroactive manner the IFRS standards for all reporting periods presented in the financial statements. The Company implemented the IFRS standards which have been published as of the preparation date of the Financial Statements and expected to be affective as of December 31, 2008.

  In implementing the transitional rules as above, the Group elected to apply the following concessions permitted by IFRS 1:

  1. Share based payments

  The rules of IFRS 2, which deals with share based payments, were not retroactively applied with regard to capital instruments which had been granted prior to November 7, 2002 and vested before the transition date.

  2. Translation differences

  The company elected to desist from retroactively applying the rules of IAS 21 for translation differences accumulated as of January 1, 2007 with respect to foreign operations. As a result, accumulated translation differences have not been included in the Opening Balance Sheet.

  3. Deemed cost for items of fixed assets

  IFRS 1 permits the measurement of items of fixed assets as of the transition date to the IFRS, or at an earlier date, on the basis of a revaluation executed according to previously applied generally accepted accounting principles, as deemed cost as of the date of the revaluation, if, in general, the revaluation was comparable to cost or undepreciated cost according to the IFRS, adjusted for changes such as changes in the index of prices.

  Through December 31, 2007, the company adjusted its financial statements to changes in the rate of exchange of the dollar, in accordance with the rules of Accounting Opinion 36 of the Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

F - 9



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  A. Applying International Accounting Standards (IFRS) (Cont.)

  (2) First term IFRS standards adoption (cont.)

  3. Deemed cost for items of fixed assets (cont.)

  For purposes of the transition to reporting pursuant to the IFRS, the company chose to apply the concession in IFRS 1 as above and to measure the items of its fixed assets acquired or constructed through December 31, 2003 at deemed cost as of that date, based on their amounts, as adjusted to changes in the rate of exchange of the dollar up to that date.

  Prior to the adoption of the IFRS, the Group prepared its financial statements according to accounting principles generally accepted in Israel. The latest annual financial statements of the company according to accounting principles generally accepted in Israel were prepared as of December 31, 2007 and for the year ended on that date. Comparative figures for that period were restated in these financial statements pursuant to the IFRS.

  See Note 21 with respect to the material differences between reporting pursuant to the IFRS and reporting according to Israeli generally accepted accounting principles, as they are relevant to the Group.

  B. The financial statements are drawn up in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in Israel and in accordance with the Israeli Securities (Preparation of Annual Financial Statements) Regulations, 1993, except for regulations that do not allow for the implementation of IFRS standards, or permissible regulations there under.

  C. Basis of preparation

  Until December 31, 2003, Israel was considered a country in which hyper-inflation conditions exist. Therefore, non-monetary balances in the balance sheet were presented on the historical nominal amount and were adjusted to changes in the exchange rate of the U.S. dollar. As of December 31, 2003 when the economy ceases to be hyper-inflationary and the Company no longer adjusted its financial statements to the U.S. dollar, the adjusted amounts as of this date were used as the historical costs. The financial statements were edited on the basis of the historical cost, except for:

  Derivative financial instruments measured by fair value.

  Inventories are stated at the lower of cost and net realizable value.

  Property, plant and equipment and intangibles assets are presented at the lower of the cost less accumulated amortizations and the recoverable amount.

  Liabilities to employees as described in note 2W below.

  D. Foreign currencies

  The individual financial statements of each Group entity are presented in the currency of the primary economic environment in which the entity operates (its functional currency). For the purpose of the consolidated financial statements, the results and financial position of each entity are expressed in the New Israeli Shekel (“NIS”), which is the functional currency of the Company and the presentation currency for the consolidated financial statements, see note 2Y (3) as follows with regard to the exchange rate and the changes in them during the reported period.

F - 10



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  D. Foreign currencies (cont.)

  In preparing the financial statements of the individual entities, transactions in currencies other than the entity’s functional currency (foreign currencies) are recorded at the rates of exchange prevailing at the dates of the transactions. At each balance sheet date, monetary items denominated in foreign currencies are retranslated at the rates prevailing at the balance sheet date. Non-monetary items carried at fair value that are denominated in foreign currencies are retranslated at the rates prevailing at the date when the fair value was determined. Non-monetary items that are measured in terms of historical cost in a foreign currency are not retranslated.

  Exchange differences are recognised in profit or loss in the period which they were created, except for exchange differences on transactions entered into in order to hedge certain foreign currency risks (Hedge accounting details are set out in Note 2Q below) and for rate differences of loans taken in different currency then NIS (see note 2M below).

  For the purpose of presenting consolidated financial statements, the assets and liabilities of the Group’s foreign operations of affiliated company (mainly because of it’s investment in a subsidiary company that presents it’s financial statements in foreign currency) are expressed in NIS using exchange rates prevailing at the balance sheet date. Income and expense items are translated at the average exchange rates for the period, unless exchange rates fluctuated significantly during that period, in which case the exchange rates at the dates of the transactions are used.

  Goodwill and fair value adjustments arising on the acquisition of a foreign operation are treated as assets and liabilities of the foreign operation and translated at the closing rate.

  E. Cash and cash equivalents

  Cash and cash equivalents include deposits that can be withdrawn anytime as well as short-term bank deposits that are not restricted in use, with a maturity of three months.

  Deposits that are restricted in use or whose maturity at the time of investment, is greater than three months but less than one year are classified under designated deposits.

  F. Basis of consolidation

  (1) General

  The consolidated financial statements incorporate the financial statements of the Company and entities controlled by the Company (its subsidiaries). Control is achieved where the Company has the power to govern the financial and operating policies of an entity so as to obtain benefits from its activities.

  The results of subsidiaries acquired or disposed of during the year are included in the consolidated income statement from the effective date of acquisition or up to the effective date of disposal, as appropriate.

  Where necessary, adjustments are made to the financial statements of subsidiaries to bring their accounting policies into line with those used by other members of the Group.

  All intra-group transactions, balances, income and expenses are eliminated in full on consolidation.

  For the effect of the issuance of IAS 27 (revised) “Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements” see note 2Z below.

F - 11



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  F. Basis of consolidation (Cont.)

  (2) Minority interests

  Minority interests in net assets (except for goodwill) of consolidated subsidiaries are presented separately under the Group’s shareholders’ equity. Minority interests include the sum of these interests on the date of the business combination (see below) as well as the share of minority shareholders in the changes that occurred in the capital of the consolidated company subsequent to the date of the business combination. Losses of consolidated subsidiaries that relate to minority, which exceed the minority interests in the shareholders’ equity of the consolidated subsidiary, are allocated to minority interests up to the amount in which the minority has a valid obligation and ability to perform additional investments to cover the losses.

  G. Business combinations

  Acquisitions of consolidated subsidiaries and activities are measured by using the purchase method. The cost of a business combination is measured based on the aggregate fair value (as of the date of exchange) of the assets acquired, liabilities incurred and capital instruments issued by the group in exchange for obtaining control in the acquired company, plus any acquisition costs incurred to the group which directly relate to the business combination. The identifiable assets of the acquired company, liabilities and contingent liabilities that meet the recognition criteria in accordance with IFRS 3 regarding business combinations are recognized at fair value on the date of acquisition, except for non-current assets (or disposal groups) that are classified as held for sale in accordance with IFRS 5 regarding non-current assets held for sale and discontinued activities, which are recognized and measured at fair value net of selling costs.

  Goodwill arising from the business combination is recognized as an asset and initially measured at cost, which represents the excess cost of the business combination over the group’s interest in the net fair value of the identifiable assets, liabilities and contingent liabilities that were recognized. If, after re-assessment, the total group’s interests in the net fair value of the identifiable assets, liabilities and contingent liabilities recognized exceed the cost of the business combination, the excess must be immediately recognized in the statement of income.

  In business combinations, where control is obtained after several exchange transactions (acquisition in stages) the assets, liabilities and contingent liabilities of the acquired company will be measured at fair value on the date in which control was obtained, while the difference between their fair value on the date of the acquisitions that preceded the business combination and their fair value on the date of the business combination shall be carried to a “Capital reserve from reevaluation from step acquisition”, which is transferred to retained earnings on the date in which the item in respect of which has been created is amortized or retired to income statement.

  The interests of minority shareholders in the acquired company are initially measured on the date of the business combination in accordance with their pro rata share in the net fair value of the assets, liabilities and contingent liabilities that were recognized. As to the accounting policy with respect to minority interest see note 2(F)2 above.

  As to the publication of IFRS 3 (amended) “Business Combinations”, see note 2Z below.

F - 12



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  H. Investments in associated companies

  An associated company is an entity over which the Group has significant influence and that is neither a subsidiary nor an interest in joint venture. Significant influence is the power to participate in the financial and operating policy decisions of the investee but is not control or joint control over those policies.

  The financial statements of the consolidated companies adopted to the accounting policies of the group.

  The results and assets and liabilities of associates are incorporated in these financial statements using the equity method of accounting. Under the equity method, investments in associates are carried in the consolidated balance sheet at cost as adjusted for post-acquisition change in the Group’s share of the net assets of the associate, less any impairment in the value of individual investments. Losses of an associate in excess of the Group’s interest in that associate (which includes any long-term interest that, in substance, form part of the Group’s net investment in the associate) are recognized only to the extent that the Group has incurred legal or constructive obligations or made payments on behalf of the associate.

  Where a group entity transacts with an associate of the Group material, profits and losses are eliminated to the extent of the Group’s interest in the relevant associate.

  I. Goodwill

  Goodwill arising on the acquisition of a subsidiary or a jointly controlled entity represents the excess of the cost of acquisition over the Group’s interest in the net fair value of the identifiable assets, liabilities and contingent liabilities of the subsidiary or jointly controlled entity recognized at the date of acquisition.

  Goodwill is initially recognized as an asset at cost and is subsequently measured at cost less any accumulated impairment losses.

  For the purpose of impairment testing, goodwill is allocated to each of the Group’s cash-generating units expected to benefit from the synergies of the combination. Cash-generating units to which goodwill has been allocated are tested for impairment annually, or more frequently when there is an indication that the unit may be impaired. If the recoverable amount of the cash-generating unit is less than the carrying amount of the unit, the impairment loss is allocated first to reduce the carrying amount of any goodwill allocated to the unit and then, the remaining impairment loss is allocated to the other assets of the unit pro-rata on the basis of the carrying amount of each asset in the unit. An impairment loss recognized for goodwill is not reversed in a subsequent period.

  On disposal of a subsidiary or a jointly controlled entity, the attributable amount of goodwill is included in the determination of the profit or loss on disposal.

F - 13



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  J. Property, plant and equipment

  Property, plant and equipments are tangible items, which are held for use in the manufacture or supply of goods or services, or leased to others, which are predicted to be used for more than one period. The Company presents its property, plant and equipments items according to the cost model.

  Under the cost method – a property, plant and equipment are presented at the balance sheet at cost (net of any investment grants), less any accumulated depreciation and any accumulated impairment losses. The cost includes the cost of the asset’s acquisition as well as costs that can be directly attributable to bringing the asset to the location and condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management.

  Spare parts which are not used on a current basis are designated for use in the context of specific items of fixed assets, where necessary. The reason for holding them is to prevent delays in the manufacturing process and to avoid a shortage in spare parts in the future. The spare parts that are not used on a current basis have not been installed on items of fixed assets and are, therefore, not available for use in their present state. In the light of this, spare parts that are not being used currently are presented with fixed assets and are depreciated beginning from the date that they are installed on the items of fixed assets for which they were purchased.

  Depreciation is calculated using the straight-line method at rates considered adequate to depreciate the assets over their estimated useful lives. The depreciation starts once the asset is ready for use and takes into consideration of the anticipated scrap value at the end of the asset’s useful lives.

The annual depreciation and amortization rates are:
Years
 
Buildings 10-50
Machinery and equipment 7-20
Motor vehicles 5-7
Office furniture and equipment 3-17

  Scrap value, depreciation method and the assets useful lives are being reviewed by management in the end of every financial year. Changes are handled as a change of estimation and are applied from here on.

  The gain or loss arising on the disposal or retirement of an item of property, plant and equipment is determined as the difference between the sales proceeds and the carrying amount of the asset and is recognized in income statement.

F - 14



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  K. Intangible assets

  (1) Intangible assets, except for goodwill

  Intangible assets are defined as identifiable, non-monetary assets without physical substance.

Intangible assets with an indefinite useful life are not amortized. Instead they are tested for impairment once a year or more frequently if indications exist that there may a decline in the value of the asset in accordance with the provisions of IAS 36. The useful life of intangible assets with an indefinite useful life is estimated at the end of each reporting year. The accounting treatment with respect to the useful life of an intangible asset that has changed from indefinite to finite, is carried out prospectively.

  Intangible assets with a definite useful life are amortized using the straight line method over the estimated useful life of the assets subject to an impairment test. The accounting treatment of the change in the estimated useful life of an intangible asset with a finite life, is carried out prospectively.

  As to the accounting treatment of goodwill see note 2I.

  The useful life which is used to amortize intangible assets with a finite useful life is as follows:

  Customer relations 5-10 years
  Software 3 years

  (2) Intangible assets acquired under a business combination

  Intangible assets acquired under a business combination are identified and recognized separately from goodwill when the meet with the definition of intangible asset and their fair value can be measured reliably. The cost of these intangible assets is their fair value on the date of the business combination.

  In subsequent periods to the initial recognition, intangible assets acquired under a business combination are presented at cost less any accumulated amortization and subsequent accumulated impairment loss. The amortization of intangible assets with a finite life is calculated based on the straight line method over the estimated useful life of these assets. The estimated useful life and method of amortization are tested at the end of each reporting year while the effect of changes in the estimates useful life is accounted for prospectively.

  As to the amendment of IAS 38 “Intangible Assets” under the improvements to International Financial Reporting Standards see note 2Z.

F - 15



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  L. Impairment of value of tangible and intangible assets, excluding goodwill

  At each balance sheet date, the Group examines the book value of its tangible and intangible assets for the purpose of determining whether there are any indications that point towards losses from impairment of value of these assets. Should there be any such indications, the recoverable amount of the asset is estimated for the purpose of determining the amount of the loss from impairment of value that was created, if at all. If it is not possible to estimate the recoverable value of an individual asset, the Group estimates the recoverable value of the cash- generating unit to which the asset is relevant. Shared assets are also allocated to individual cash generating units to the extent that a reasonable and consistent basis can be identified for such allotment. Should allocating the shared assets to individual cash generating units on the above basis not be feasible, the shared assets are allocated to the smallest groups of cash generating units as to which a reasonable and consistent basis for allocation can be identified.

  Intangible assets with an indefinite useful life and intangible assets that are still not available for use are tested for impairment once a year or more frequently if indications exist that there may a decline in the value of the asset.

  The recoverable amount is the higher of the sales price of the asset, less selling costs, and of its utility value. In estimating utility value, an approximation of future cash flows is discounted to their present value, using a pre- tax discount rate which reflects the current market estimates of the value of money over time and the specific risks for the asset for which the estimate of future cash flows has not been adjusted.

  If the carrying value of the asset (or of the cash generating unit) exceeds recoverable amount, the book value of the asset (or of the cash generating unit) is reduced to its recoverable amount. The impairment loss is recognized immediately to as an expense in the statement of income.

  If an impairment loss that was recognized in previous periods is reversed, the book value of the asset (or of the cash generating unit) will be restored back to the estimate of the up to date recoverable value but not to exceed the book value of the asset (or of the cash generating unit) that would have existed, had a related impairment loss not been recognized in prior periods. The reversal of the loss from impairment of value is immediately recognized in the statement of income.

  As to the impairment of goodwill see note 2I. As to the impairment of investment in an affiliate company, see note 2H.

  M. Borrowing costs

  Borrowing costs directly attributable to the acquisition, construction or production of qualifying assets, which are assets that necessarily take a substantial period of time to get ready for their intended use or sale, are assed to the costs of those assets, until such time as the assets are substantially ready for their intended use or sale.

  Investment income earned on the temporary investment of specific borrowings pending their expenditure on qualifying assets is deducted from the borrowing costs eligible for capitalization.

  The rest of the borrowing costs are recognized in profit or loss.

  For the effect of the issuance of IAS 23 (revised) “Borrowing costs” see Note 2Z below.

F - 16



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  N. Inventories

  Inventories are assets held for sale in the ordinary course of business, in the process of production for such sale or in the form of materials or supplies to be consumed in the production process or in the rendering of services.

  Inventories are stated at the lower of cost and net realizable value. Cost of inventories includes all the cost of purchase, direct labor, fixed and variable production over heads and other cost that are incurred, in bringing the inventories to their present location and condition.

  Net realizable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business less the estimated costs of completion and the estimated costs necessary to make the sale.

  Inventories that purchased on differed settlement terms, which contains a financing element, are stated in purchase price for normal credit terms. The difference between the purchase price for normal credit terms and the amount paid is recognized as interest expense over the period of the financing.

  Cost determined as follows:  
  Raw, auxiliary materials and others Based on weighted-average basis.
  Finished products and products in process Based on overhead absorption costing.

  The spare parts that are in continuous use, are not associated with the specific fixed assets. Some of these spare parts are even sold to the Group’s affiliated companies, as needed, and are part of the inventory. Based on the experience accumulated by the Company, these spare parts are held for no longer than 12 months. In light of the above, the spare parts that are in continuous use are presented in inventory clause, and recognized in the profit and loss report when used.

  O. Financial assets

  (1) General

  Investments are recognized and derecognized on trade date where the purchase or sale of an investment is under a contract whose terms require delivery of the investment within the timeframe established by the market concerned, and are initially measured at fair value, plus transaction costs, except for those financial assets classified as at fair value through profit or loss, which are initially measured at fair value.

  Financial assets are classified into loans and receivables and to financial assets through profit and loss. The classification of those categories arises from the reason of the financial assets holding and it is determined at its initial recognition.

F - 17



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  O. Financial assets (Cont.)

  (2) Loans and receivables

  Trade receivables, loans, and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classified as loans and receivables. Loans and receivables are measured at amortized cost using the effective interest method, less any impairment. Interest income is recognized by applying the effective interest rate, except for short-term receivables when the recognition of interest would be immaterial.

  (3) Financial assets at FVTPL

  Financial assets are classified as at FVTPL where the financial asset is either held for trading or it is designated as at FVTPL.

  A financial asset is classified as held for trading if:

  it has been acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the near future; or

  it is a part of an identified portfolio of financial instruments that the Group manages together and has a recent actual pattern of short-term profit-taking; or

  it is a derivative that is not designated and effective as a hedging instrument.

  Financial assets at FVTPL are stated at fair value, with any resultant gain or loss recognized in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognized in profit or loss incorporates any dividend or interest earned on the financial asset.

  (4) Impairment of financial assets

  Financial assets, except for financial assets classified as at fair value through profit or loss, are assessed for indicators of impairment at each balance sheet date.

  Financial assets are impaired where there is objective evidence that, as a result of one or more events that occurred after the initial recognition of the financial asset, the estimated future cash flows of the investment have been impacted.

  Objective evidence of impairment could include:

  Significant financial difficulty of the issuer or counterparty; or

  Default or delinquency in interest or principal payments; or

  It becoming probable that the borrower will enter bankruptcy or financial re-organization.

  For certain financial assets, such as customers as to which no indications of value impairment have been identified, the company evaluates value impairment on a specific basis, in reliance on past experience and changes in the level of delinquency in payments, as well as economic changes related to the sector and the economic environment in which it operates.

  The carrying amount of the financial asset is reduced by the impairment loss directly for all financial assets with the exception of trade receivables, where the carrying amount is reduced through the use of an allowance account.

When a trade receivable is considered uncollectible, it is written off against the allowance account. Subsequent recoveries of amounts previously written off are credited against the allowance account. Changes in the carrying amount of the allowance account are recognized in profit or loss.

F - 18



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  P. Financial liabilities and equity instruments issued by the Group

  (1) Classification as debt or equity

  Debt and equity instruments are classified as either financial liabilities or as equity in accordance with the substance of the contractual arrangement.

  An equity instrument is any contract that evidences a residual interest in the assets of an entity after deducting all of its liabilities. Equity instruments issued by the Group are recorded at the proceeds received, net of direct issue costs.

  Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities “at FVTPL” or “Other financial liabilities” for the published IAS 32 (amended), financial instruments: present an IAS-1: presentation of financial statements see note 2Z as follows.

  (2) Options to sell sales of an investee

  The company has an obligation that is derived from an option that it gave for the sale of shares of an investee, which provide the holder thereof with the right to sell its holdings in the investee in consideration of a variable amount of cash.

  The value of the option was computed according to the economic value of the option and is presented with non current liabilities, and classified as a liability at fair value through operations.

  Any gain or loss that results from changes in the fair value of the option is recognized in operations.

  See Note 4B (3) below for further details on the conditions of the option.

  (3) Other financial liabilities

  Other financial liabilities (capital note issued to an investee), are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. Other financial liabilities are subsequently measured at amortized cost using the effective interest method.

  The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortized cost of a financial liability and of allocating interest expense over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash payments through the expected life of the financial liability, or, where appropriate, a shorter period. Financial liabilities which stand for immediately payment, presented at their full value.

  For the treatment at CPI-linked other financial liabilities see note 2P (4) below.

  (4) CPI-linked liabilities

  The Company has liabilities that are linked to the Consumer Price Index (hereinafter –the CPI), which are not measured at fair value under the statement of income. The Company determines the effective interest rate in respect of these liabilities as a real rate with the addition of linkage differences in line with actual changes in the CPI until the balance sheet date.

F - 19



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  Q. Derivative financial instruments

  (1) General

  The Group enters into a variety of derivative financial instruments to manage its exposure to foreign exchange rate risk, including foreign exchange forward contracts on exchange rate, options on exchange rate and contracts on the CPI due to notes.

  Derivatives are initially recognized at fair value at the date a derivative contract is entered into and are subsequently remeasured to their fair value at each balance sheet date. The resulting gain or loss is recognized in profit or loss immediately unless the derivative is designated and effective as a hedging instrument, in which event the timing of the recognition in profit or loss depends on the nature of the hedge relationship. The Group designates certain derivatives as hedges of highly probable forecast transactions or hedges of foreign currency risk of firm commitments (cash flow hedges).

  A derivative is presented as a non-current asset or a non-current liability if the remaining maturity of the instrument is more than 12 months and it is not expected to be realised or settled within 12 months. Other derivatives are presented as current assets or current liabilities.

  (2) Hedge accounting

  The Group designates certain hedging instruments, which include derivatives, and non-derivatives in respect of foreign currency risk, as cash flow hedges.

  At the inception of the hedge relationship, the entity documents the relationship between the hedging instrument and the hedged item, along with its risk management objectives and its strategy for undertaking various hedge transactions. Furthermore, at the inception of the hedge and on an ongoing basis, the Group documents whether the hedging instrument that is used in a hedging relationship is highly effective in offsetting changes in fair values or cash flows of the hedged item.

  The Group implements cash flow hedge accounting both in respect of future transactions, foreign currency deposits and options transactions on foreign currency that are designed to secure payments for the acquisition of fixed assets in foreign currency in respect of future transactions for the purchase or sale of foreign currency that are designed to secure payments for imports and which are linked to foreign currency and in respect of future transaction on the Consumer Price Index, which are designed to secure payments on CPI-linked bonds.

  The effective part of the changes in the value of financial instruments designed for cash flow hedging is immediately recognized in shareholders’ equity under the headline “capital reserve in respect of cash flow hedging” and the non-effective part is immediately recognized in the statement of income.

F - 20



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  Q. Derivative financial instruments (Cont.)

  (2) Hedge accounting (Cont.)

  Hedge accounting for cash flows is discontinued when the hedging instrument expires, sold or realized of when the hedging relations no longer meet the threshold conditions for hedging. After the discontinuation of hedge accounting, the amounts carried to shareholders’ equity are carried to the income statement while the hedged item or the hedged projected transactions are recorded in the income statement.

  When hedging a forecasted transaction on non-monetary assets (fixed income), the capital reserve is added to the initial cost of the hedged item immediately upon the initial recognition of said item and recorded in the income statement over the period of amortization of the fixed asset in respect of which it was recorded.

  R. Revenue recognition

  Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable. Revenue is reduced for estimated customer returns, rebates and other similar allowances.

  (1) Sale of goods

  Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when all the following conditions are satisfied:

  The Group has transferred to the buyer the significant risks and rewards of ownership of the goods;

  The Group retains neither continuing managerial involvement to the degree usually associated with ownership nor effective control over the goods sold

  The amount of revenue can be measured reliably;

  It is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the entity; and

  The costs incurred or to be incurred in respect of the transaction can be measured reliably.

  (2) Interest revenue

  Interest revenue is accrued on a time basis, by reference to the principal outstanding and at the effective interest rate applicable, which is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset to that asset’s net carrying amount.

  (3) Dividends

  Revenue is recognized when the Group’s right to receive the payment is established.

  (4) Reporting of revenues on a gross basis or a net basis

  The Company’s revenues as an agency or intermediary from providing electricity, water, steam, and logistical services to the Group without bearing the risks and returns that derive from the transaction are presented on a net basis.

F - 21



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  S. Leasing

  Leases are classified as finance leases whenever the term of the lease transfer substantially all the risks and rewinds of ownership to the lessee. All other leases are classified as operating leases.

  Leases of land from the Israel Lands Administration

  Leases of land from the Israel Lands Administration are classified as operating leases. The deferred lease payments that were made on the date of the start of the lease are presented in the balance sheet with Deferred lease expenses, and are amortized on the straight line basis over the balance of the lease period, including the extension option.

  The company has land lease rights from the Municipality of Tel Aviv which comply with the definition of investment real estate, and, pursuant to IAS 40, have been classified as operating leases and not as investment real estate.

  T. Provisions

  Provisions are recognized when the Group has a present obligation (legal or constructive) as a result of a past event, it is probable that the Group will be required to settle the obligation, and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. The amount recognized as a provision is the best estimate of the consideration required to settle the present obligation at the balance sheet date, taking into account the risks and uncertainties surrounding the obligation. Where a provision is measured using the cash flows estimated to settle the present bligation, its carrying amount is the present value of those cash flows.

  When some or all of the economic benefits required to settle a provision are expected to be recovered from a third party, the receivable is recognized as an asset if it is virtually certain that reimbursement will be received and the amount of the receivable can be measured reliably.

  U. Share – Based payments

  In accordance with IFRS 2 and IFRIC 11, equity-settled share based payments to employees and others providing similar services are measured at the fair value of the equity instruments at the grant date. The Company determines the fair value of equity-settled share-based transaction according to the Black-Scholes model. Details regarding the determination of the fair value of share-based transactions are set out in note 10.

  The fair value determined at the grant date of the equity-settled share-based payments is expensed on a straight-line basis over the vesting period, based on the Group’s estimate of equity instruments that will eventually vest. At each balance sheet date, the Group revises its estimate of the number of equity instruments expected to vest. The impact of the revision of the original estimates, if any, is recognized in profit or loss over the remaining vesting period, with a corresponding adjustment to the equity-settled employee benefits reserve.

  For the effect of the issuance of amendment to IFRS 2 Share Based Payment- Vesting and Revocation Conditions, see note 2Z below.

F - 22



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  V. Taxation

  (1) General

  Income tax expense represents the sum of the tax currently payable and change in deferred tax excluding deferred tax as result of transaction that was attribute directly to the equity.

  (2) Current tax

  The tax currently payable is based on taxable profit for the year. Taxable profit differs from profit as reported in the income statement because it excludes items of income or expense that are taxable or deductible in other years and it further excludes items that are never taxable or deductible. The Group’s liability for current tax is calculated using tax rates that have been enacted or substantively enacted by the balance sheet date.

  (3) Deferred tax

  Deferred tax is recognised on differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities in the financial statements and the corresponding tax bases used in the computation of taxable profit, and is accounted for using the balance sheet liability method. Deferred tax liabilities are generally recognised for all taxable temporary differences, and deferred tax assets are generally recognised for all deductible temporary differences to the extent that it is probable that taxable profits will be available against which those deductible temporary differences can be utilised. Such assets and liabilities are not recognised if the temporary difference arises from goodwill or from the initial recognition (other than in a business combination) of other assets and liabilities in a transaction that affects neither the taxable profit nor the accounting profit.

  The carrying amount of deferred tax assets is reviewed at each balance sheet date and reduced to the extent that it is no longer probable that sufficient taxable profits will be available to allow all or part of the asset to be recovered.

  Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured at the tax rates that are expected to apply in the period in which the liability is settled or the asset realised, based on tax rates (and tax laws) that have been enacted or substantively enacted by the balance sheet date. The measurement of deferred tax liabilities and assets reflects the tax consequences that would follow from the manner in which the Group expects, at the reporting date, to recover or settle the carrying amount of its assets and liabilities.

  Deferred tax assets and liabilities are offset when there is a legally enforceable right to set off current tax assets against current tax liabilities and when they relate to income taxes levied by the same taxation authority and the Group intends to settle its current tax assets and liabilities on a net basis.

F - 23



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  W. Employee benefits

  (1) Post-Employment Benefits

  The Group’s post-employment benefits include: benefits to retirees and liabilities for severance and retirement benefits. The Group’s post-employment benefits are classified as either defined contribution plans or defined benefit plans. Most of the Group’s employees have signed Section 14 to the Severance Law, 1963, pursuant to which the Group’s regular deposits with pension funds and/or insurance policies exempt it from any further obligations to the workers, for whom said amounts were deposited. The Group’s deposits under the Defined Contribution Plan are carried to the income statements on the date of the provision of work services, in respect of which the Group is obligated to make the deposit and no additional provision in the financial statements is required.

  Expenses in respect of a Defined Benefit Plan are carried to the income statement in accordance with the Projected Unit Credit Method, while using actuarial estimates that are performed at each balance sheet date. The current value of the Group’s obligation in respect of the defined benefit plan is determined by discounting the future projected cash flows from the plan by the market yields on government bonds, denominated in the currency in which the benefits in respect of the plan will be paid, and whose redemption periods are approximately identical to the projected settlement dates of the plan.

  Actuarial profits and losses are carried to the statement of recognized income and expenses on the date they were incurred. The Past Service Cost is immediately recognized in the Group’s income statement to the extent the benefit has vested. A past service cost which has not yet vested is amortized on a straight-line basis over the average vesting period until the benefit becomes vested.

  The Group’s liability in respect of the Defined Benefit Plan which is presented in the Group’s balance sheet, includes the current value of the obligation in respect of the defined benefit, with the addition (net of) actuarial profits (losses), which were not yet recognized and less past service cost that was not yet recognized, net of the fair value of the plan’s assets. A net plan, which is created from said calculation, is limited to the amount of the actuarial losses and past service cost that were not yet recognized with the addition of the current value of available economic benefits in the shape of returns from the plan or in the shape of reduction in future contributions to the plan.

  (2) Other long term employee benefits

  Other long term employee benefits are benefits which it is anticipated will be utilized or which are to be paid during a period that exceeds 12 months from the end of the period in which the service that creates entitlement to the benefit was provided.

  Other employee benefits of the company include liabilities for vacation pay. These liabilities are recorded to operations in accordance with the projected unit credit method, through the use of actuarial estimates which are performed at each balance sheet date. The present value of the company’s obligation for vacation pay was determined by means of the capitalization of anticipated future cash flows from the program at market yields of government bonds, denominated in the currency in which the benefits for vacation will be paid and having redemption dates nearly identical to the forecasted payment dates of the vacation pay.

  Gains and losses are recorded to the statement of operations at the time that they are created. Past service cost is immediately recognized in the financial statements of the company.

F - 24



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  W. Employee benefits (Cont.)

  (3) Short term employee benefits

  Short term employee benefits are benefits which it is anticipated will be utilized or which are to be paid during a period that does not exceed 12 months from the end of the period in which the service that creates entitlement to the benefit was provided.

  Short term company benefits include the company’s liability for short term absences, payment of grants, bonuses and compensation. These benefits are recorded to the statement of operations when created. The benefits are measured on a non capitalized basis. The difference between the amount of the short term benefits to which the employee is entitled and the amount paid is therefore recognized as an asset or liability.

  X. Net income per share

  The computation of basic net income per share is generally based on earnings available for distribution to holders of ordinary shares, divided by the weighted average number of ordinary shares outstanding during the period.

  In computing diluted net incomeper share, the weighted average number of shares to be issued, assuming that all dilutive potential shares are converted into shares, is to be added to the average number of ordinary shares used in the computation of the basic income (loss) per share. Potential shares are taken into account, as above, only when their effect is dilutive (reducing net income per share from continuing activities).

  Y. Exchange Rates and Linkage Basis

  (1) Foreign currency balance, or balances linked to foreign currency are included in the financial statements according to the exchange rate announced by the Bank of Israel on the balance sheet date.

  (2) Balances linked to the CPI are presented according to index of the last month of the report period (the index of the month of the financial reports).

  (3) Following are the changes in the representative exchange rates of the Euro and the U.S. dollar vis-a-vis the NIS and in the Israeli Consumer Price Index (“CPI”):

Representative
exchange rate of
the dollar
(NIS per $1)

Representative
exchange rate of
the Euro (NIS per
€1)

CPI
"in respect of"
(in points)

 
As of:                
December 31, 2008    3.802    5.297    198.42  
December 31, 2007    3.846    5.659    191.15  

%
%
%
 
Increase (decrease) during the:                
Year ended December 31, 2008    (1.1 )  (6.39 )  3.8  
Year ended December 31, 2007    (9.0 )  1.7    3.4  

F - 25



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  Z. Adoption of new and revised Standards and interpretations

  (1) New effective standards and interpretations, which are implemented in these financial statements

  IFRS 2, IFRIC 11 - "Group and Treasury Share Transactions"

  IFRIC 11 provides guidance on applying IFRS 2 with respect to certain arrangements of share-based payments involving an entity’s own equity instruments as well as arrangements involving the parent company’s equity instruments. The interpretation stipulates the method of classification of these arrangements as share-based payment transaction that are settled with equity instruments or as share-based payment transactions that are settled in cash.

  IAS 19, IFRIC 14 – “The limit on a Defined Benefit Asset, Minimum Funding Requirements and their Interaction”

  IFRIC 14 determines the meaning of “refunds from the plan or reductions in future contributions to the plan” during the calculation of the a defined benefit asset that will be recognized in respect of a defined benefit plan, and clarifies how an asset or liability guidance in respect of a pension plan could be affected by statutory or contractual funding requirements. The provisions of IFRIC 14 apply to annual reporting periods commencing on January 1, 2008

  The implementation of IFRIC 14 does not have any impact on the Group’s financial statements.

  (2) Standards, Amended Standards and Clarifications that have been Published but not yet Become Effective, and have not been Adopted by the Company in Early Adoption

  IAS 1 (Amended) “Presentation of Financial Statements”

  The standard stipulates the presentation required in the financial statements, and itemizes a general framework for the structure of the financial statements and the minimal contents which must be included in the context of the report. Changes have been made to the existing presentation format of the financial statements, and the presentation and disclosure requirements for the financial statements have been broadened, including the presentation of an additional report in the framework of the financial statements known as the “report of comprehensive income”, and the addition of a balance sheet as of the beginning of the earliest period that was presented in the financial statements, in cases of changes in accounting policy by means of retroactive implementation, in cases of restatement and in cases of reclassifications.

  The standard will be effective for reporting periods beginning from January 1, 2009. The standard permits earlier application.

  At this stage, the management of the Group is unable to assess the effect of the standard on its financial condition and operating results.

F - 26



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  Z. Adoption of new and revised Standards and interpretations (cont.)

  (2) Standards, Amended Standards and Clarifications that have been Published but not yet Become Effective, and have not been Adopted by the Company in Early Adoption (cont.)

  IAS 23 (Amended) “Borrowing Costs”

  The standard stipulates the accounting treatment of borrowing costs. In the context of the amendment to this standard, the possibility of immediately recognizing borrowing costs related to assets with an uncommon period of eligibility or construction in the statement of operations was cancelled. The standard will apply to borrowing costs that relate to eligible assets as to which the capitalization period began from January 1, 2009. The standard permits earlier implementation.

  The company’s management estimates that the implementation of the Standard is not expected to have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements.

  IFRS 8, Operating Segments

  The standard, which replaces IAS 14, details how an entity must report on data according to segments in the annual financial statements. The standard, among other things, stipulates that segmental reporting of the company will be based on the information that management of the company uses for purposes of evaluating performance of the segments, and for purposes of allocating resources to the various operating segments. The standard will apply to annual reporting periods commencing on January 1, 2009, with restatement of comparative figures for prior reporting periods. The standard permits earlier adoption.

  At this stage, the management of the Group is unable to assess the effect of the standard on its financial condition and operating results.

  IAS 27 (Amended) “Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements”

  The standard prescribes the rules for the accounting treatment of consolidated and separate financial statements. Among other things, the standard stipulates that transactions with minority shareholders, in the context of which the company holds control of the subsidiary before and after the transaction, will be treated as capital transactions. In the context of transactions, subsequent to which the company loses control in the subsidiary, the remaining investment is to be measured as of the date that control is lost, at fair value, with the difference as compared to book value to be recorded to the statement of operations. The minority interest in the losses of a subsidiary, which exceed its share in shareholders’ equity, will be allocated to it in every case, while ignoring its obligations and ability to make additional investments in the subsidiary.

  The provisions of the standard apply to annual financial reporting periods which start on January 1, 2010 and thereafter. Earlier adoption is permitted, on the condition that it will be done simultaneous with early adoption of IFRS 3 (amended). The standard will be implemented retrospectively, excluding a number of exceptions, as to which the provisions of the standard will be implemented prospectively

  The company’s management estimates that the implementation of the Standard is not expected to have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements.

F - 27



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  Z. Adoption of new and revised Standards and interpretations (cont.)

  (2) Standards, Amended Standards and Clarifications that have been Published but not yet Become Effective, and have not been Adopted by the Company in Early Adoption (cont.)

  IFRS 3 (Amended) “Business Combinations”

  The new standard stipulates the rules for the accounting treatment of business combinations. Among other things, the standard determines measurement rules for contingent consideration in business combinations which is to be measured as a derivative financial instrument. The transaction costs directly connected with the business combination will be recorded to the statement of operations when incurred. Minority interests will be measured at the time of the business combination to the extent of their share in the fair value of the assets, including goodwill, liabilities and contingent liabilities of the acquired entity, or to the extent of their share in the fair value of the net assets, as aforementioned, but excluding their share in goodwill.

  As for business combinations where control is achieved after a number of acquisitions (acquisition in stages), the earlier purchases of the acquired company will be measured at the time that control is achieved at their fair value, while recording the difference to the statement of operations.

  The standard will apply to business combinations that take place from January 1, 2010 and thereafter. Earlier adoption is possible, on the condition that it will be simultaneous with early adoption of IAS 27 (amended).

  The company’s management estimates that the implementation of the Standard is not expected to have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements.

  Amendment to IFRS 2, Share Based Payment- Vesting and Revocation Conditions

  The amendment to the standard stipulates the conditions under which the measurement of fair value must be considered on the date of the grant of a share based payment and explains the accounting treatment of instruments without terms of vesting and revocation. The provisions of the standard apply to annual financial reporting periods which start on January 1, 2009 and thereafter. Earlier adoption is permitted.

  The company’s management estimates that the implementation of the Standard is not expected to have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements.

  Amendment to IAS 32, Financial Instruments: Presentation, and IAS 1, Presentation of Financial Statements

  The amendment to IAS 32 changes the definition of a financial liability, financial asset and capital instrument and determines that certain financial instruments, which are exercisable by their holder, will be classified as capital instruments.

  The provisions of the standard apply to annual financial reporting periods which start on January 1, 2009 and thereafter. Earlier adoption is permitted.

  At this stage, the management of the Group is unable to assess the effect of the standard on its financial condition and operating results.

F - 28



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  Z. Adoption of new and revised Standards and interpretations (cont.)

  (2) Standards, Amended Standards and Clarifications that have been Published but not yet Become Effective, and have not been Adopted by the Company in Early Adoption (cont.)

  IFRIC 16 “Hedges of a Net Investment in a Foreign Operation”

  This interpretation establishes the nature of the hedged risk and the amount of the hedged item under the hedges of a net investment in a foreign operation. In addition, the interpretation stipulates that the hedging instrument may be held by any entity within the group, and the amount to be reclassified from equity to profit or loess when the entity disposes of the foreign operation, for which the accounting method of hedges of a net investment in a foreign operation has been implemented.

  The provisions of the interpretation apply to annual reporting periods commencing on January 1, 2009. An early adoption is permitted.

  The Group’s management estimates that the implementation of the interpretation will not have any impact on the financial statements of the Group.

  (3) Improvement to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) 2008

  In May 2008 the IASB published a series of improvements for IFRS.

  Improvements include amendments to some of the standards, which change the manner of presentation, recognition and measurement of different items in the financial statements.

  In addition, amendments have been made to terms that have a negligible impact, if any, on the financial statements.

  Most of the amendments will become effective as of the annual reporting period commencing January 1, 2009 or thereafter, with an option for early adoption. The implementation of most amendments will be carried out by retrospective adjustment of comparative figures.

  Some of the amendments to the standards are expected, under relevant circumstances, to have a material impact on the financial statements. The prominent amendments are the new or amended requirements with respect to the following:

  Amendment to IAS 28 “Investments in Associated Companies”, which stipulates that the impairment of investment in an associated company shall be treated as an impairment of a single asset and that the amount of impairment can be cancelled in subsequent periods.

  The amendment will apply to annual periods commencing on January 1, 2009. This amendment allows for the early implementation while implementing the amendments relating to Section 4 in IAS 32 “Financial Instruments: Presentation”, Section 1 in IAS 31 “Rights in Joint Transactions” and Section 3 in IFRS 7 “Financial Instruments: Disclosure”. The amendments can be applied retrospectively.

  At this stage the Group’s management cannot assess the effect of implementation of the amendment on its financial statements.

  Amendment IAS 38 “Intangible Assets”, which stipulates that payments in respect of advertising and sales promotion activities will be recognized as an asset until the date in which the entity has the right to access the acquired goods or in the event of a receipt of services,the date of receipt of the services.

F - 29



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  Z. Adoption of new and revised Standards and interpretations (cont.)

  (3) Improvement to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) 2008 (cont.)

  The amendment will apply to annual periods commencing on January 1, 2009 and shall be carried out retroactively. The amendment allow for early adoption. The Group’s management estimates that the effect of implementing the amendment on the Group’s financial statements is immaterial.

  Amendment to IAS 19 – Employee Benefits

  a. Curtailments and negative past service costs

  The amendment changes the definitions in the Standard and makes the following distinction: curtailments may be created when reducing the degree of link between future wage increases and benefits to be paid in respect of past services. In contrast, when the plan amendment relates to past services and leads to a reduction in the present value of defined plan obligation, the amendment will meet the definition of negative past service cost. That is, the amendment stipulates that when a plan amendment reduces the benefits to which the employee is entitled, the effect of the reduction in respect of future services falls under the definition of curtailment, whereas the reduction in benefits to which the employee is entitled in respect of past services constitutes negative past service costs.

  The amendments will apply on changes in benefits that occurred as of January 1, 2009 and are to be applied prospectively. Early implementation is permitted.

  b. Plan management costs

  The amendment cancels the existing inconsistency and changes the definition of “Return on Plan Assets”.

The defined was amended so as to clarify that plan management costs should be deducted from the calculation of the return on plan assets only to the extent that they are not included in the actuarial assumptions used to measure the liabilities in respect of a defined benefit.

  The amendment shall apply to annual reporting periods commencing on January 1, 2009 and shall be applied prospectively. Early implementation is permitted.

  c. Amendments to the definitions of Short-term Employee Benefits and Other Long-term Employee Benefits

  Short-term employee benefits are employee benefits which fall due wholly within twelve months after the end of the period in which the employees render the related service.

Other long-term employee benefits are employee benefits which do not fall due wholly within twelve months after the end of the period in which the employees render the related service.

  As a result, there was a lack of clarity regarding the method of classification of employee benefits, such as absence of payment to which the employee is entitled, but which is not expected to be used within 12 months of the end of the period.

F - 30



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Cont.)

  Z. Adoption of new and revised Standards and interpretations (cont.)

  (3) Improvement to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) 2008 (cont.)

  Under the amendment, the definitions of short-term employee benefits and “long-term employee benefits” were changed so as to determine that for the purpose of establishing whether the employee benefit is short term or long term, the expected date of using the benefit should be examined. As a result, entities will have to examine the need to bifurcate employee benefits, such as entitlement to compensation in respect of short-term absences, into the aforementioned two categories.

The amendment shall apply to annual reporting periods commencing on January 1, 2009 and shall be applied prospectively. Early implementation is permitted.

  Amendment of IFRS 1 “First-time adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards” and IAS 27 “Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements

  This amendment stipulates, inter alia, the method of measurement of investments in subsidiaries, companies under joint control and associated companies on the date of the first-time adoption of IFRS and the method of recognition of revenue from dividends received from said companies. The provisions of the amendment apply to the separate financial statements of the entity.

  The provisions of the amendment apply to annual reporting periods commencing on January 1, 2009.

  The Company elected for an early adoption of the amendment to IFRS 1 (hereinafter –“IFRS 1”) which permits an entity, for presentation in the separate financial statements, to measure the company’s investments in subsidiaries and in associated companies at deemed cost as of January 1, 2007.

  Amendment of IAS 39 “Financial instruments: Recognition and Measurement”

  The amendment, inter alia, stipulates that inflation may be hedged if changes in inflation are a contractually specified portion of cash flows of a recognized financial instrument. The amendments make clear that the intrinsic value, not the time value of acquired options, can be used as a hedging instrument of a one-sided risk arising from a forecast transaction. The provisions of the amendment apply to annual reporting periods commencing on January 1, 2010 or thereafter. Early adoption of the amendment is permitted.

  At this stage, the company’s management is unable to estimate the effect of implementing the amendment on its financial condition and operating results.

F - 31



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 3 CRITICAL ACCOUNTING JUDGEMENTS AND KEY SOURCES OF ESTIMATION UNCERTAINTY

  A. General

  In the application of the Group’s accounting policies, which are described in Note 2 above, management is required to make judgments, estimates and assumptions about the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. The estimates and associated assumptions are based on historical experience and other factors that are considered to be relevant. Actual results may differ from these estimates.

  The estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to accounting estimates are recognized in the period in which the estimate is revised if the revision affects only that period or in the period of the revision and future periods if the revision affects both current and future periods.

  B. Critical judgments in applying accounting policies

  The following are the critical judgments, apart from those involving estimations (see below), that the management have made in the process of applying the entity’s accounting policies and that have the most significant effect on the amounts recognized in financial statements:

  Deferred taxes- the company recognizes deferred tax assets for all of the deductible temporary differences up to the amount as to which it is anticipated that there will be taxable income against which the temporary difference will be deductible. During each period, for purposes of calculation of the utilizable temporary difference, management uses estimates and approximations as a basis which it evaluates each period.

  Approximation of length of life of items of fixed assets- each period, the company’s management evaluates salvage values, depreciation methods and length of useful lives of the fixed assets.

  Measuring provisions and contingent liabilities and contingent liabilities- see C(1) below.

  Measuring obligation for defined benefits and employee benefits- see C(2) below.

  Measuring share based payments- see NOTE 10 below.

  Measuring the fair value of an option to sell shares of an associated company – see C(3) below.

  Measuring the fair value on account of the allocation of the cost of acquisition – see C(4) below.

  C. Key sources of estimation uncertainty .

  1. Provisions for legal proceeding

  Against the company and its subsidiaries there are 5 claims pending and open in a total amount of approximately NIS 10,680 thousands (December 31, 2007: NIS 23,124 thousands), in respect of them a provision was credited in a sum of NIS 28 thousands (December 31, 2007: NIS 300 thousands was recorded). For purposes of evaluating the legal relevance of these claims, as well as determining the reasonableness that they will be realized to its detriment, the company’s management relies on the opinion of legal and professional advisors. After the company’s advisors expound their legal position and the probabilities of the company as regards the subject of the claim, whether the company will have to bear its consequences or whether it is will be able to rebuff it, the company approximates the amount which it must record in the financial statements, if at all.

F - 32



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 3 CRITICAL ACCOUNTING JUDGEMENTS AND KEY SOURCES OF ESTIMATION UNCERTAINTY (Cont.)

  C. Key sources of estimation uncertainty (cont.)

  1. Provisions for legal proceeding (cont.)

  An interpretation that differs from that of the legal advisors of the company as to the existing legal situation, a varying understanding by the company’s management of the contractual agreements as well as changes derived from relevant legal rulings or the addition of new facts may influence the value of the overall provision with respect to the legal proceedings that are pending against the company and, thus material affect the company’s financial condition and operating results.

  2. Employee benefits

  The present value of the company’s obligation for the payment of benefits to pensioners and severance pay to employees that are not covered under Section 14 to the Severance Pay Law is based upon a great amount of data, which are determined on the basis of an actuarial estimation, through the utilization of a large number of assumptions, including the capitalization rate. Changes in the actuarial assumptions could affect the book value of the obligation of the company for employees’ benefits payments, vacation and severance pay. The company approximates the capitalization rate once annually, on the basis of the capitalization rate of government bonds. Other key assumptions are determined on the basis of conditions present in the market, and on the basis of the cumulative past experience of the company.

  3. Fair value of an option to sell shares of an associated company

  As stated in note 2P (2), the company has a liability that arises from an option to sell shares of an associated company, which is classified as a fair value liability through profit or loss. In establishing the fair value of the option, the company bases its decision on the valuation of an independent external expert with the required expertise and experience. This valuation is carried out once a quarter.

  The company strives to establish a fair value that is as objective as possible, but at the same time the process of establishing the fair value includes some objective elements, since changes in the assumptions used in determining the fair value can have a material impact on the financial situation and operating results of the company.

  4. Measurement at fair value on account of the allocation of the cost of acquisition  

  For the purpose of allocating the cost of acquisition and determining the fair value of the tangible and intangible assets and the liabilities of the consolidated subsidiaries at the date of consolidation, the Company’s management based itself primarily on valuations prepared by external and independent real-estate appraisers and assessors, possessing the required know-how, experience and expertise.

  The fair value was determined according to generally-accepted valuation methods, including: Proposed market prices in active markets, discounting of cash flows and the comparison of selling prices of similar assets and company assets in the immediate proximity. When the discounted cash flows method was employed, the interest rate for discounting the net cash flows expected from the assets possesses a material impact on its fair value.

F - 33



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 3 CRITICAL ACCOUNTING JUDGEMENTS AND KEY SOURCES OF ESTIMATION UNCERTAINTY (Cont.)

  C. Key sources of estimation uncertainty (cont.)

  4. Measurement at fair value on account of the allocation of the cost of acquisition (cont.)

  In determining the fair value, the business/operational risk associated with the company’s operations is taken into account, to the extent relevant. Part of the said risk is the risk associated with the nature of the sector wherein the company operates, while part of the risk stems from the Company’s specific characteristics.

  The Group strives to determine a fair value that is as objective as possible, yet the process of estimating the fair value also includes subjective elements, originating inter alia from the past experience of the Company’s management and its understanding of expected events in the market wherein the Group operates at the date when the fair value was determined.

  In light of the above, and in view of the aforementioned in the preceding paragraph, the setting of the fair value of the Group calls for employing judgment. Changes in the assumptions that serve for setting the fair value can materially affect the Group’s situation and results of operation.

  For additional details regarding the Group’s use of measurement of fair value on account of the allocation of cost of acquisition, see Note 15.

NOTE 4 INVESTMENTS IN ASSOCIATED COMPANIES:

  a. Details of Subsidiaries and Associated Companies

Percentage of direct and indirect holding in shares
conferring equity and voting rights

%
 
Main subsidiaries: *        
        
    Amnir Recycling Industries Limited    100.00  
    Graffiti Office Supplies and Paper Marketing Ltd.    100.00  
    Attar Marketing Office Supplies Ltd.    100.00  
    Hadera Paper Industries Ltd.    100.00  
    Carmel Container Systems Limited    89.30  
    Frenkel C.D. Limited**    52.74  
Main associated companies:    
    Hogla-Kimberly Ltd.    49.90  
    Mondi Hadera Paper Ltd.    49.90  

* Not including dormant companies.

** Frenkel C.D. Limited is partly held through the Company in the rate of 27.85% and partly held through Carmel Container Systems Limited (in the rate of 24.86%) the holding in voting shares of C.D. Packaging Systems Limited is 52.74%.

F - 34



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 4 INVESTMENTS IN ASSOCIATED COMPANIES: (cont.)

  b. Investments in associated companies

  The Company has a number of investments in associated companies, which are held either directly or through investee companies on December 31, 2008. The financial statements of significant associated companies Mondi Hadera Paper Ltd. (formerly Neusiedler Hadera Paper Ltd, NHP) and Hogla-Kimberly Ltd are attached to these financial statements. )The data for December 31, 2007 including also Carmel Containers System Ltd. and Frenkel C.D. Ltd. Since September 1 2008, the company consolidate Carmel Containers System Ltd. and Frenkel C.D. Ltd data, see note 15 below)

  1. Composed as follows:

December 31
2008
2007
NIS in thousands
 
Investment in Shares:            
    Cost    1,875    7,325  
     Gain on issuance of shares of an associated  
          company to a third party    40,241    40,241  
      Adjustments from translation of foreign currency  
          financial statements    (22,186 )  3,810  
      Share in cash flow hedging capital    (2,426 )  (635 )
      Share in Actuarial losses    (307 )  -  
      Share in profits since acquisition, net    247,935    241,008  


     265,132    291,749  
Long-term loans and capital notes *    52,969    54,654  


     318,101    346,403  



  * Classified by linkage terms and rate of interest, the total amounts of the loans and capital notes are as follows:

Weighted average
interest rate
at December 31,
2008

December 31
2008
2007
%
NIS in thousands
 
Capital notes in dollars           -    2,698  
Unlinked loans and capital notes    5.3 %  52,969    51,956  


          52,969    54,654  



  As of December 31, 2008, the repayment dates of the balance of the loans and capital notes have not yet been determined.

F - 35



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 4 INVESTMENTS IN ASSOCIATED COMPANIES: (cont.)

  2. The changes in the investments during 2008 are as follows:

NIS in
thousands

 
Balance at the beginning of the year      346,403  

Changes during the year:  
    Share in profits of associated companies - net    51,315  
       increase in the share of holding from associated companies to subsidiaries    (49,839 )
    Differences from translation of foreign currency financial statements    (25,996 )
    Share in capital surplus of hedging cash flows at associated companies    (1,790 )
    Share in capital surplus from recording actuarial gains to reserves    (307 )
    Decrease in balance of long-term loans and capital notes - net    (1,685 )

Balance at end of year    318,101  


  3. Mondi Hadera Paper Ltd. (hereafter - Mondi Hadera; formerly – Neusiedler Hadera Paper Ltd. – NHP):

Mondi Hadera is held to the extent of 49.9% by the Company and also by Mondi Business Paper LTD (hereafter – MBP), As part of an agreement dated November 21, 1999 with Mondi Business Paper (hereafter MBP, formerly Neusiedler AG), Mondi Hadera purchased the operations of the Group in the area of writing and typing paper and issued 50.1% of its shares to MBP.

  As part of this agreement, MBP was granted an option to sell its holdings in Mondi Hadera to the company, at a price 20% lower than its value (as defined in the agreement) or $ 20 million less 20%, whichever is higher. According to oral understandings between persons in the company and persons in MBP, which were formulated in proximity to signing the agreement, MBP will exercise the option only in extremely extraordinary circumstances, such as those which obstruct manufacturing activities in Israel over a long period.

  In view of the extended period which has passed since the date of such understandings and due to changes in the management of MBP, the company has chosen to take a conservative approach, and, accordingly, to reflect the economic value of the option in the context of the transition to reporting according to international standards. The total value of the option as of December 31, 2008, is NIS 13.9 million and as of December 31, 2007 is 3.9 million.

  4. Hogla-Kimberly Ltd. (hereafter – Hogla-Kimberly)

  Hogla-Kimberly is held to the extent of 49.9% by the Company and to the extent of 50.1% by Kimberly Clark Corporation (hereafter- KC).

F - 36



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 5 FIXED ASSETS:

  a. Composition of assets and the accumulated depreciation thereon, grouped by major classifications, and changes therein during 2008, are as follows:

Cost
Accumulated depreciation
 
Balance at
beginning of
year

Additions
during the
year

Disposals
during the year

Initial
Consolidation

Balance
at end
of year

Balance at
beginning of
year

Additions
during the
year

Disposals
during the
year

Initial
Consolidation

Balance
at end
of year

Depreciated balance
December 31

2008
NIS in thousands
 
Land and buildings thereon      207,001    2,393    25    19,888    229,257    114,653    2,478    -    13,925    131,056    98,201  
Machinery and equipment    762,771    31,147    1,997    488,341    1,280,262    529,195    44,187    1,496    344,147    916,033    364,229  
Vehicles    35,245    6,617    903    6,902    47,861    21,311    4,248    872    6,073    30,760    17,101  
Office furniture and  
equipment (including  
computers)    72,417    2,779    8    23,183    98,371    51,310    2,478    8    21,720    75,500    22,871  
Payments on account of  
machinery and equipment, net    21,782    216,921    -    142    238,845    -    -    -    -    -    238,845  
Spare parts - not current, net    22,484    3,811    -    -    26,295    -    -    -    -    -    26,295  











     1,121,700    263,668    2,933    538,456    1,920,891    716,469    53,391    2,376    385,865    1,153,349    767,542  












F - 37



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 5 FIXED ASSETS: (cont.)

  a. Composition of assets and the accumulated depreciation thereon, grouped by major classifications, and changes therein during 2007, are as follows:

Cost
Accumulated depreciation
 
Balance at
beginning of
year

Additions
during the
year

Disposals
during the
year

Balance
at end
of year

Balance at
beginning
of year

Additions
during the year

Disposals
during the
year

Balance
at end
of year

Depreciated
balance

December 31
2007
NIS in thousands
 
Land and buildings thereon      191,237    15,863    99    207,001    111,248    3,557    154    114,651    92,350  
Machinery and equipment    702,206    80,592    20,027    762,771    512,044    25,658    8,505    529,197    233,574  
Vehicles    35,339    5,228    5,322    35,245    23,049    3,409    5,147    21,311    13,934  
Office furniture and equipment  
   (including computers)    70,847    2,377    807    72,417    59,379    2,125    10,194    51,310    21,107  
Payments on account of machinery  
and equipment, net    49,329    (27,547 )  -    21,782    -    -    -    -    21,782  
Spare parts - not current, net    22,705    -    221    22,484    -    -    -    -    22,484  









     1,071,663    76,513    26,476    1,121,700    705,720    34,749    24,000    716,469    405,231  










F - 38



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 5 FIXED ASSETS: (cont.)

  b. The item is net of investment grants in respect of investments in “approved enterprises”.

  c. Depreciation expenses amounted to NIS 53,391 thousands and NIS 34,749 thousands NIS for the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007 respectively.

  d. As of December 31, 2008 and 2007, the cost of fixed assets includes borrowing costs of NIS 27,071 thousands and NIS 1,007 thousands capitalized to the cost of machinery and equipment for the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007, respectively.

  e. As of December 31, 2008 and 2007, the cost of fixed assets includes payroll costs of NIS 1,987 thousands and NIS 2,168 thousands capitalized to the cost of machinery and equipment for the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007, respectively.

  f. For details of rights in lands – see note 6 as follows.

NOTE 6 RIGHTS LANDS:

  The Company’s real estate is partly owned and partly leased and some lease fees have been capitalized. The leasehold rights are for 49-57 year periods ending in the years 2008 to 2059, with options to extend for an additional 49 years.

  Details as of December 31, 2008:

NIS in
thousands

 
Land owned      50,226  
Property under capitalized lease (lease rights for the period ending on 2059).    24,438  
Property under non-capitalized lease (lease rights for different periods ending in 2049).    11,906  

     86,570  


  Presented in the balance sheets as follows:

December 31
2008
2007
NIS in thousands
 
Fixed assets      50,226    45,172  
Expenditure for lease    36,344    34,900  


     86,570    80,072  



F - 39



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 7 OTHER INTANGIBLE ASSETS:

  a. Composition and changes are as follows:

Software
Order
backlog

Goodwill
Portfolio of
Customers

Total
NIS in thousands
 
Cost                        
Balance at January 1, 2008     -    -    -    4,147    4,147  
Purchase of intangible assets    178    -    -    1,750    1,928  
Initial Consolidation    1,199    3,082    599    29,095    33,975  





Balance at December 31, 2008       1,377     3,082     599     34,992     40,050  





   
Cost   
Balance at January 1, 2007    -    -    -    4,147    4,147  





Balance at December 31, 2007       -     -     -     4,147     4,147  





    
Accumulation amortization and impairment:   
Balance at January 1, 2008    -    -    -    2,569    2,569  
Deduction    334    3,082         1,799    5,215  
Initial Consolidation    747    -    -    -    747  





Balance at December 31, 2008       1,081     3,082     -     4,368     8,531  





    
Accumulation amortization and impairment:   
Balance at January 1, 2007    -    -    -    1,864    1,864  
Deduction    -    -    -    705    705  





Balance at December 31, 2007       -     -     -     2,569     2,569  





    
Amortized cost:   
December 31, 2008     296    -    599    30,624    31,519  





December 31, 2007     -    -    -    1,578    1,578  






  b. Amortization of intangible assets is presented in the statement of income under the following items:

Year ended December 31
2008
2007
NIS in thousands
 
Selling and marketing expenses      970    -  
Cost of sales    3,082    -  
General and administrative expenses    1,163    705  

  c. Additional information:

  The Group has a list of customers that was created internally. This list is a significant asset for the group, but at the same time is not recognized as an asset in the group’s financial statements, since the list, which was created internally, does not meet the criteria for asset recognition.

  As for testing the impairment of other intangible assets see note 2L above.

F - 40



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 8 FIINANCIAL LIABILITIES:

  a. Notes

December 31
2008
2007
NIS in thousands
Series IV
Series III
Series II
Series I
Series II
Series I
 
Balance *      235,557    190,541    158,559    7,422    182,052    14,098  
Less - current maturities    -    -    31,712    7,422    30,342    7,049  






     235,557    190,541    126,847    -    151,710    7,049  







  Distribution according to repayment dates as of December 31, 2008:

Nis in
thousands

 
1st year - Current maturity      39,134  
2nd year     92,142  
3rd year     92,142  
4th year     92,142  
5th year     92,144  
6th year and forward     184,375  

     592,079 *  


  * The aforementioned detailed balance does not include deferred issuance expenses in the amount of NIS 1,179 thousands (as of December 31, 2007 – NIS 625 thousand) which were deducted from the bonds balance.

  1) Series I – May 1992

  The balance of the notes as of December 31, 2008 is redeemable in one installment, due in June 2009. The installment amounting to 6.66% of the original par value of the notes, which is NIS 105,055 thousands, in December 2008 terms; the unpaid balance of the notes bears annual interest of 3.8%, payable annually each June. The notes –principal and interest – are linked to the Israeli known CPI (base CPI of February 1992).

  2) Series II – December 2003

  The balance of the notes as of December 31, 2008 is redeemable in 5 equal, annual installments due in December of each of the years 2009-2013; the unpaid balance of the notes bears annual interest of 5.65%, payable annually each December. The notes – principal and interest – are linked to the Israeli known CPI (based CPI of November 2003).

  3) Series III and IV – July – August 2008

  On July 14, 2008 the Company contemplated a public offering pursuant to the shelf prospectus published by the Company in Israel on May 26, 2008 of two new series of debentures. The Company has offered an aggregate principal amount of NIS 187,500 thousands of debentures (Series 3 – CPI linked) issued in return for approximately NIS 187,500 thousands bearing an interest rate of 4.65% and payable annualy each on July 10th of the years 2010-2018. In addition the company has offered an aggregate principal amount of NIS 120,560 thousands of (Series 4) debentures issued in return for approximately NIS 120,560 thousands bearing an interest rate of 7.45% and payable annualy each on July 10th of the years 2010-2015.

F - 41



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 8 NOTES AND OTHER LONG-TERM LIABILITIES: (cont.)

  a. Notes: (cont.)

  3) Series III and IV – July – August 2008 (cont.)

  The net proceeds of the offering net of issue expenses are NIS 306,000 thousands.

  On August 14, 2008 the Company raised of (Series 4) debentures according to the shelf prospectus published by the Company in Israel on May 26, 2008. The company issued NIS 114,997 thousands of Series 4 debentures issued in return for approximately NIS 119,800 thousands bearing an interest rate of 7.45%. The net proceeds of the offering net of issue expenses are NIS 119,167 thousands.

  4) As of December 31, 2008 the balance of the notes amounts to NIS 554,124 thousands, is after deduction of issuance costs.

  b. Credit from bank and others

  1) Composition of financial liabilities measuring at depreciated balance:

Yearly
Interest Rate

Current Liabilities
As of December 31

Non-Current Liabilities
As of December 31

Total
As of December 31
31/12/08
2008
2007
2008
2007
2008
2007
%
NIS in thousands
NIS in thousands
NIS in thousands
 
Banks:                                
Credit from banks    3.8%-4.5 %  77,655    143,015    -    -    77,655    143,015  
   
Loans:   
linked to the CPI    3.8%-5.65 %  11,060    -    24,212    -    35,272    -  
    
Unlinked    3.8%-7.45 %  26,275    5,384    97,698    28,127    123,973    33,511  






Total financial liabilities measured at amortized cost          114,990    148,399    121,910    28,127    236,900    176,526  







  2) Distribution according to repayment dates as of December 31, 2008:

NIS in
thousands

 
1st year - Current maturities of long-term loans      37,335  

2nd year     36,096  
3rd year     36,028  
4th year     31,123  
5th year     15,122  
6th year and forward     3,541  

     159,245  


  c. Financial Parameters and Covenants

  The Company has no financial covenants vis-à-vis the banks. However, in relation to long-term loans to the bank, from a company that was associated until August 31, 2008, and that was consolidated for the first time on September 1, 2008, whose balance as at December 31, 2008, amounts to a total sum of NIS 19,316 thousands, the consolidated subsidiary undertook toward the bank, inter alia, that the ratio of tangible shareholders’ equity of the company to the balance sheet total will not fall below 19%.

  The said consolidated subsidiary fails to meet the aforesaid financial covenants, yet the bank nevertheless agreed, true to the balance sheet date, to delay the exercise of its rights pursuant to the letter of undertaking, provided that the company will forward the bank signed financial statements for the year 2008, by May 31, 2009, and will make available to the bank by that date, collateral and security at a sum that will not fall below the sum necessary in order to supplement the tangible shareholders’ equity, until such time that the financial covenants are met. The Company believes that the consolidated subsidiary will meet these covenants.

  d. Other financial liabilities

  Other financial liabilities include capital note from an associated company. The capital note is unlinked and interest free. The associated company intend to demand the repayment of the capital note till March 31, 2009, and due to the abovementioned intention, as of December 31, 2008, the capital note was classified to current liabilities .

F - 42



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 9 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

  a. Composition

As of December 31
2 0 0 8
2 0 0 7
 
Post Employment Benefits at defined benefit plan:            
Benefits to retirees    7,632    8,117  
Severance pay and retirement liability (asset)    3,560    (861 )


     11,192    7,256  


Other long term employee benefits:   
Benefits for unused vacation    16,360    11,603  


    
Severance pay benefits     3,734    2,645  


     31,286    21,504  


Short term employee benefits:   
Salaries and wages, payroll and social benefits    27,711    17,722  
Profit-sharing and bonus plans    15,766    10,522  


     43,477    28,244  


Stated in the balance sheet as follows:  
Employee benefit assets:  
Current assets    -    -  
Non-current assets    624    861  


     624    861  


Employee benefit liabilities:  
Current liabilities - part of other payables and  
    accrued expenses -see note 13 d (2)    43,477    28,244  
Non-current liabilities    31,910    22,365  


      75,387    50,609  



  b. Post Employment Benefits

  (1) Defined benefit plan

  Plans for Severance pay obligations

  Labor laws and the severance pay law in Israel and abroad require companies in the Group to pay severance benefits to employees who are dismissed, resign or retire from their employment under different specific circumstances. Liabilities for employee severance benefits are calculated pursuant to the employment agreement in effect at the time of their employment and based on the employee’s wages which, in management’s opinion, creates entitlement to the severance benefits, taking into consideration the number of years of employment.

  The Company and its subsidiaries have an approval from the Ministry of Labor and Welfare in accordance with Section 14 of the Severance Pay Law, 1963, pursuant to which its regular deposits with pension funds and/or insurance policies, exempt it from any further obligation to employees, in respect of whom the aforementioned deposits were made. The Group deposits 8.33%-11.33% of the monthly wages of its employees in different benefit plans. The Groups has no legal or implied obligation to make additional payments if the plan will not have sufficient assets to pay the entire employee benefits relating to the employee’s service during current and past periods. The total amount of the expenses recognized in the statement of income in respect of defined benefit plans in the year that ended on December 31, 2008 is NIS 15,889 thousands (2007 – NIS 15,249 thousands).

F - 43



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 9 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS: (cont.)

  b. Post Employment Benefits (cont.)

  (2) Plans for defined deposit

  (1) General

  Labor laws and the severance pay law in Israel and abroad require companies in the Group to pay severance benefits to employees who are dismissed, resign or retire from their employment under different specific circumstances. Liabilities for employee severance benefits are calculated pursuant to the employment agreement in effect at the time of their employment and based on the employee’s wages which, in management’s opinion, creates entitlement to the severance benefits, taking into consideration the number of years of employment.

  The defined benefit liability was measured using actuarial assessments. The present value of the defined benefit liability and the related costs of current service and past service were measured using the projected unit credit method.

  Assumptions regarding future mortality rates are based on statistic data and mortality tables published by the Commissioner of the Capital Market in the Ministry of Finance in Pension Circular 2007-3-6, which are adjusted as of December 31, 2001. The average life expectancy for men that retired at the age of 67 is 17.4 while the average life expectancy for women that retired at the age of 62-64 is 22.5-24.3.

  The projected rate of return on plan assets is based on a nominal rate of return that varies according to the type of fund.

  (2) Changes in the current value of the liability in respect of a defined benefit plan

For the year ended December 31
2008
2007
NIS in thousand
 
Open Balance      2,440    1,982  
Current service cost    505    224  
Interest rate cost    318    80  
Actuarial losses    260    336  
Paid-up benefits    (1,148 )  (182 )
Liabilities assumed in business combinations    19,646    -  
Other    (28 )  -  


Closing balance     21,993    2,440  



  (3) Changes in the fair value of plan assets

2008
2007
NIS in thousand
 
Opening balance      2,440    1,473  
Projected return on plan assets    231    60  
Actuarial profits (losses)    (1,478 )  604  
Deposits by the employer    799    429  
Paid-up benefits    (851 )  (126 )
Assets acquired in business combinations    16,950    -  
Other    (282 )  -  


Closing balance     17,809    2,440  



F - 44



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 9 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS: (cont.)

  c. Other long-term employee benefits

  (1) General

  Other long-term employee benefits are benefits which are expected to be utilized or which are payable during a period greater than 12 months from the end of the period in which the entitling service was provided.

  Other employee benefits in the Company include liabilities in respect of vacation pay. These benefits are included in the statement of income in accordance with the Projected Unit Credit Method, while using actuarial assessments at each balance sheet date. The current value of the Company’s liability for vacation pay is determined by discounting the projected future cash flows from the plan based on market yields of government bonds, which are stated in the currency in which vacation pay benefits will be paid, whose terms to maturity are identical to the projected vacation payment dates.

  Profits and losses are carried to the income statement as incurred. Past service cost is immediately recognized in the Company’s financial statements.

  (2) Changes in the current value of the liability in respect of other long-term employee benefits

2008
2007
NIS in thousand
 
Opening balance      19,720    18,913  
Current service cost    (183 )  1,038  
Interest rate cost    1,159    1,034  
Actuarial profits    (613 )  -  
Paid-up benefits    (1,484 )  (1,265 )
Liabilities assumed in business combinations    5,393    -  


Closing balance     23,992    19,720  



  d. Main actuarial assumptions as of the balance sheet date of post employment benefits and other long term benefits

As of December 31
2008
2007
%
%
 
Discount rate      6.07 %  3.6 %
Projected rates of return regarding asset plan    4.1%-6.2 %  3.9%-5.95 %
Projected rates of salary increases    4.25 %  4.25 %
Churn and departure rates    2%-36 %  4.5%-25 %

  e. Severance pay benefits

  The benefits include liability in respect of retirement grant to the company’s CEO (see note 12c) and include early retirement liability.

F - 45



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 9 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS: (cont.)

  f. Amounts recognized in the statement of income in respect of employee benefit plans (in respect of post employment benefits and other long term benefits)

For the year ended December 31
2008
2007
NIS in thousand
 
Current service cost      406    1,089  
Interest rate cost    1,494    1,114  
Projected yield on the plan's assets    (232 )  (63 )
Effect of any reduction or settlement    (1,935 )  (1,289 )


     (267 )  851  


   
The expense was included in the following items:    
   
Cost of sales    (1,425 )  187  
Selling expenses    97    (79 )
Administrative and general expenses    (299 )  (196 )
Financing expenses    1,263    1,051  
Capitalized amounts    97    (112 )


     (267 )  851  



NOTE 10 SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY:

  a. Share capital

  Composed of ordinary registered shares of NIS 0.01 par value, as follows:

December 31
2008
2007
Authorized
Issued and paid
 
Number of shares of NIS 0.01      20,000,000    5,060,774    5,060,774  



Amount in NIS    200,000    50,608    50,608  




  The shares are traded on stock exchanges in Tel-Aviv and in the U.S. (“AMEX”). The quoted prices per share, as of December 31, 2008 are NIS 109.1 and $ 28.5 (NIS 108.4), respectively.

  As part of the Company’s arrangement for the financing of the acquisition of the new machine for the manufacture of packaging paper in November 2007, the Company performed a private allotment of 1,012,585 ordinary shares of NIS 0.01 par value of the Company, which, as of the date of allotment, accounted for 20% of the issued share capital of the Company against an investment in the total sum of NIS 213 million (hereinafter in this section: “the raised amount”). About 60% of the shares (607,551 shares) were allotted to the shareholders in the Company, Clal Industries and Investments and Discount Investments (hereinafter: “the special offerees”), in accordance with the pro-rata holdings in the Company, and 40% of the shares (405,034 shares) were offered by way of a tender to institutional entities and private entities. The price per share for institutional entities and private entities as determined in the tender was NIS 210. Accordingly, the price per share for Clal Industries and Investments and Discount Investments considering the amount of shares offered to Clal Industries and Investments and Discount Investments, was set at NIS 211.05 (the price per share in the tender plus a rate of 0.5%).

F - 46



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 10 SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY: (cont.)

  a. Share capital (cont.)

  The company paid the distributors a rate of 1.2% of the total consideration received from institutional entities and private entities, that is, a sum of NIS 1,021 thousands.

  The share capital was increased as a result from this issuance in amounts of NIS 10 thousands and the capital surplus that divided from the issuance in deduction of cost issuance as mentioned above amounts of NIS 211,635 thousands.

  b. Employee stock option plans:

  1) The 2001 plan for senior officers in the Group

  On April 2, 2001, the Company’s board of directors approved a stock option plan for senior officers in the Group (hereafter – the 2001 plan for senior officers). Under this plan, 194,300 options were allotted on July 5, 2001 without consideration. Each option can be exercised to purchase one ordinary share of NIS 0.01 par value of the Company. The options are exercisable in four equal annual batches. The blocking period of the first batch is two years, commencing on the date of grant; the blocking period of the second batch is three years from the date of grant, and so forth. Each batch is exercisable within two years from the end of the blocking period.

  The exercise price of the options granted as above was set at NIS 217.00, linked to the CPI, on the basis of the known CPI on April 2, 2001. The exercise price for each batch is determined as the lesser of the aforementioned exercise price or the average price of the Company’s shares as quoted on the Tel-Aviv Stock Exchange (hereafter - the Stock Exchange) during the thirty trading days preceding to the effective date of each batch, less 10%. The 2001 plan for senior officers expired during July 2007.

  In 2007, 35,425 options, were exercised under the 2001 plan for senior officers, and 15,466 shares of NIS 0.01, were issued following the exercise of the options, as above.

  This plan is designed to be governed by the terms stipulated by Section 102 of the Israeli Income Tax Ordinance. Inter alia, these terms provide that the Company is allowed to claim, as an expense for tax purposes, the amounts credited to the employees as a benefit in respect of shares or options granted under the plan.

  The amount allowed as an expense for tax purposes, at the time the employee utilizes such benefit, is limited to the amount of the benefit that is liable to tax as labor income, in the hands of the employee; all being subject to the restrictions specified in Section 102 of the Income Tax Ordinance.

  Since the Company did not recognize the expense in its books (as part of selecting the relief allowed by IFRS 1, under which the provisions of IFRS 2, regarding options which were granted before November 7, 2002 and which vested prior to the transition date, shall not be implemented retroactively – see note 2a(2)), the Company credited the tax saving derived from the exercise of benefits by employees in the 2007 to capital surplus.

  2) The 2008 plan for senior officers in the Group

  In January 2008, the Board of Directors of the Company approved a program for the allotment, for no consideration, of non marketable options to the CEO of the company, to employees and officers of the company and investees. In the context of the program, an allotment of 285,750 options was approved, of which 40,250 options were to the CEO of the company, 135,500 to management of the subsidiaries and 74,750 to management of the affiliates.

F - 47



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 10 SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY: (cont.)

  b. Employee stock option plans: (cont.)

  2) The 2008 plan for senior officers in the Group (cont.)

  The granting date of the options was determined to January-March 2008, pursuant to the restrictions of Section 102 (equity track) of the Income Tax Ordinance.

  On May 11, 2008, the board of directors of the company approved the allotment to a trustee of the balance of the options that had not been allotted through that date, in the amount of 35,250 options as a pool for the future grant to officers and employees of associated companies, subject to the approval of the board of directors.

  On January 9, 2009, 34,000 options have been allotted from the allotted options of the trustee to associated company's officers. On December, 31, 2008, there are 1,250 options existing at the trustee.

  Each option is exercisable into one ordinary share of the company with NIS 0.01 par value against the payment of an exercise increment in the amount of NIS 223.965. The options will vest in installments as follows: 25% of the total options will be exercisable from January 14, 2009; 25% of the total options will be exercisable from January 14, 2010; 25% of the total options will be exercisable from January 14, 2011; and 25% of the total options will be exercisable from January 14, 2012. The vested options are exercisable through January 14, 2012, 2013, 2014 for the first and second, third and fourth portions, respectively.

  The cost of the benefit embedded in the allotted options as above, on the basis of the fair value as of the date they are granted, was approximated to be the amount of approximately NIS 13.5 million. This amount was charged to the statement of operations over the vesting period. The debt for the grant to officers of the affiliates will be paid in cash.

The fair value of the options granted as aforementioned was estimated by applying the Black and Scholes model. In this context, the effect of the terms of vesting will not taken into account by the company, other than the market condition of fair value of the capital instruments granted.

  The parameters which were used for implementation of the model are as follows:

 
Share price (NIS)      245.20-217.10
Exercise price (NIS)    223.965  
Anticipated volatility (*)    27.04 %
Length of life of the options (years)    3-5  
Non risk interest rate    5.25 %

  (*) The anticipated volatility is determined on the basis of historical fluctuations of the share price of the company. The average length of life of the option was determined in accordance with management’s forecast as to the holding period by the employees of options granted to them, in consideration of their functions in the company and past experience of the company with employees leaving.

  3) Additional details of options granted to employees

2008
2007
No. Of
options

Weighted
average the of
exercise price

No. Of
options

Weighted
average of the
exercise price

 
Options granted to employees which:                    
Outstanding at the start of the period    -         35,425    127.35  
Granted    250,500    223.96    -       
Forfeited    (4,250 )  223.96    -       
Exercised    -         (35,425 )  119.76  
Expired    -         -       


Outstanding at the end of the period    246,250    223.96    -       



F - 48



HADERA PAPER LTD

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 10 SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY: (cont.)